BitBucket: 10 million users

BitBucket is celebrating an important milestone – 10 million registered users. With 28 million repositories and 3.5 million build minutes every week, BitBucket is a vital tool for many teams.

I am (and have been) a member of several teams and projects, which heavily rely on BitBucket (and BitBucket pipelines) for their day-to-day operation.

Happy 10 million milestone, BitBucket! Keep it the great work!

GitGuardian API Security Best Practices

The team behind GitGuardian, a tool that helps developers to keep credentials and other secrets outside of the source code, shares their documentation for the API security best practices.

The cool bit about their documentation is that it covers both how to avoid the issues and how to solve them if they happened.

gita – manage multiple git repositories

gita is a command line tool to manage multiple git repositories in parallel. You can easily check the status of several repositories, pull, push, commit, and so on.

This is a nice alternative to how we are handling things at work, with hundreds of repositories all around, but with a lot of overlap between them too. For us, a custom set of scripts works pretty well, with a combination of a powerful terminal emulator. Terminator, for example, provides handy functionality of split screen view, with grouped terminals, where multiple screens can be easily updated with a single command input.

GrumPHP – PHP quality control tool

GrumPHP is yet another quality control tool for PHP. But unlike a million other – PHPUnit, PHP CodeSniffer, and the like – this one is more of a tying knot. GrumPHP integrates via git hooks. It runs one more of the other tools, making sure that the changes you are committing are up to the par.

The support for other tools is excellent. You’ll find anything from the basic unit tests and coding style checks to commit message formatting and content, Robo tasks, and even custom shell scripts.

On good commit messages

The evolution goes on.  Now that we’ve kind of sorted out most of our infrastructure, development tools, flows and processes, I guess, it’s time to look deeper into the things we’ve had for a while and reiterate over them.

Recently, I’m seeing a lot of blog posts on articles on how to write good commit messages.  Sure, we’ve had these for a while.  But lately things get a little bit more serious.

Here’s one (in Russian) that I’ve read recently.  Here’s another one (in English) that shares some of the concepts and suggestions.

What are they saying?  Well, “write better commit messages”, obviously.  But there are a couple of specific bits which I found interesting.  They are:

  • Conventional Commits – a specification for adding human and machine readable meaning to commit messages.
  • Commitizen (git cz) – a tool that help to write conventional commits.

For the skeptics among you, I slightly share your feeling.  It does seem like a bit too much overhead.  But as someone who works with an ever-growing team on a large number of projects, I think there is a place for it.  It’ll take a while to integrate, update the process, and enforce the discipline, but I think it’s well worth it.  At the very least, it deserves a try.