jExcel – the JavaScript spreadsheet

Tables on the web are always challenging. Whether you do them by hand, or with the help of a framework or library, they often carry a lot of complexity, performance costs, and compatibility issues.

Recently I came across jExcel, which seems to be quite powerful, with lots of advanced features, and, at the same time, rather simple to use. The recent release of version 3, brings even more features and improves on the existing ones:

  • Drag and drop columns
  • Resizable rows
  • Merge columns
  • Search
  • Pagination
  • Lazy loading
  • Full screen flag
  • Image upload
  • Native color picker
  • Better mobile compatibility
  • Better nested headers compatibily
  • Amazing keyboard navegation support
  • Better hidden column management
  • Great data picker: dropdown, autocomplete, multiple, group options and icons
  • Importing from XSLX (experimental)

Have a look at some of the usage examples too.

Experiments: Limited Web Experience

Smashing Magazine runs a series of articles by Chris Ashton, a senior software engineer at BBC, in which he experiences the web for one day with a selected limitation. So far he has tried the following:

termtosvg – record terminal sessions as SVG animations

termtosvg (GitHub repo) is a handy little tool that makes recording animated sessions in the terminal as simple as humanly possible. Instead of generating heavy graphics or video animations, this tool creates SVG files, which are a lot smaller and easier. There is also a selection of themes to choose from.

Th resulting SVG files can be used as quick demos and guides in READMEs on GitHub, or as tutorials for your application’s website.

Lazydocker – a simple terminal UI for both docker and docker-compose

Lazydocker is a simple terminal UI for easier management of Docker. This is particularly useful for new Docker users, but can as well save plenty of keystrokes to the seasoned administrators.

How HTTPS Works in 10 Minutes

How HTTPS Works in 10 Minutes” is a simple, high-level overview of how HTTPS works. It doesn’t dive into too much detail or heavy math. But it does cover the main stages of how the connection is established, verified, and encrypted. These are the stages that are covered:

  1. You go to an HTTPS website via your browser
  2. The Client says “Hello”
  3. The Server says “Hello”
  4. The Client makes sure the SSL certificate is legitimate
  5. The Client gets the public key from the SSL certificate
  6. The Client uses the public key to make more random bytes
  7. The Client and Server make session keys
  8. The Client and Server compare session keys
  9. If the session keys match, game on