Text processing in the shell

Whether you are an experienced shell user, or just a newbie, have a look at this article for a collection of the great tools and examples of how to process text in the shell. It includes all the usual suspects: cat, head, tail, wc, grep, cut, paste, sort, uniq, awk, tr, fold, and sed. Great examples and real life scenarios for each are also provided, with the logic explained and more complex use cases broken down into steps.

Google Chrome Tab Groups

Thanks to this great tip I’ve discovered the recently added Tab Groups functionality in Google Chrome browser. All you need to do is navigate to chrome://flags/ , search for “Tab Groups” feature, enable it, and restart your browser. Once that is done, right-click on any tab and you’ll see the option to “Add to new group”. Any tab that is already a part of the group, can be removed from there and added to any other existing group.

It is possible to rename groups and assign each one a color. In the screenshot above you can see how my groups look right now. Yellow ALT, red LM, blue PP, purple TTM, and green BLOG are tab groups. A color running under tabs to the right of each group indicates which tabs are part of the group to the left.

Grouped tabs are also a lot easier to move around and separate into a new browser window.

Git tips: disable diff prefix

Pure gold.

Firefox add-ons: Firefox Multi-Account Containers

I’ve been using Google Chrome as my primary and only browser for years now. But this particular Firefox add-on – Firefox Multi-Account Containers – makes me seriously consider switching back to Firefox again.

Firefox Multi-Account Containers lets you keep parts of your online life separated into color-coded tabs that preserve your privacy. Cookies are separated by container, allowing you to use the web with multiple identities or accounts simultaneously.

This is pure gold for anyone who works with multiple accounts on any given site. Examples: Gmail, Facebooks, Twitter, Amazon AWS, and many more.