Packets-per-second limits in EC2

Packets-per-second limits in EC2” is an interesting dive into network limits on the Amazon EC2. Even if you aren’t hitting any limits yet, this article provides plenty of useful information, including benchmarking tools and quick reference links for Enhanced Networking.

The conclusion of the article is:

By running these experiments, we determined that each EC2 instance type has a packet-per-second budget. Surprisingly, this budget goes toward the total of incoming and outgoing packets. Even more surprisingly, the same budget gets split between multiple network interfaces, with some additional performance penalty. This last result informs against using multiple network interfaces when tuning the system for higher networking performance.
The maximum budget for m5.metal and m5.24xlarge is 2.2M packets per second. Given that each HTTP transaction takes at least four packets, we can translate this to a maximum of 550k requests per second on the largest m5 instance with Enhanced Networking enabled.

How To Build a Serverless CI/CD Pipeline On AWS

How To Build a Serverless CI/CD Pipeline On AWS” is a nice guide to some of the newer Amazon AWS services, targeted at developers and DevOps. It shows how to tie together the following:

  • Amazon EC2 (server instances)
  • Docker (containers)
  • Amazon ECR (Elastic Container Registry)
  • Amazon S3 (storage)
  • Amazon IAM (Identity and Access Management)
  • Amazon CodeBuild (Continuous Integration)
  • Amazon CodePipeline (Continuous Delivery)
  • Amazon CloudWatch (monitoring)
  • Amazon CloudTail (logs)

The examples in the article are for setting up the CI/CD pipeline for .NET, but they are easily adoptable for other development stacks.

Build load-balanced servers in AWS EC2 using CloudFormation

Build load-balanced servers in AWS EC2 using CloudFormation” is an excellent guide on deploying load balancer servers with EC2 instances to Amazon AWS cloud with CloudFormation infrastructure management tool. The guide covers a variety of topics from the actual deployment to security and monitoring.

There are many different approaches for load balancing traffic in Amazon AWS, and this one is not a holy grail solution, but it provides plenty of insight into available tools and options.

Immutable Deployment @ Quorum


Immutable Deployment @ Quorum” describes yet another approach to automated, and this case – immutable, deployments.  This particular setup is slightly more on the SysAdmin/DevOps side rather than on the development side, utilizing tools like Ansible, Amazon EC2, and Amazon AMI.

If you are building very few projects, or projects with little variations, and use a whole instance for the project, than you should definitely check it out.  For those people who work with a zoo of technologies and share the server between several projects, this approach probably won’t work so well.  Unless it is adjusted to use containers instead of instances, but even then, it’ll probably won’t be optimal.

7 ways to do containers on AWS


7 ways to do containers on AWS” covers a variety of different ways to run containers on the Amazon AWS cloud infrastructure.  These include most of the usual suspects, like Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS), Amazon Elastic Container Service for Kubernetes (EKS), and hand-rolled vanilla containers on EC2, as well as a few lesser known ones like templated Kubernetes and Amazon Fargate.