Firefox add-ons: Firefox Multi-Account Containers

I’ve been using Google Chrome as my primary and only browser for years now. But this particular Firefox add-on – Firefox Multi-Account Containers – makes me seriously consider switching back to Firefox again.

Firefox Multi-Account Containers lets you keep parts of your online life separated into color-coded tabs that preserve your privacy. Cookies are separated by container, allowing you to use the web with multiple identities or accounts simultaneously.

This is pure gold for anyone who works with multiple accounts on any given site. Examples: Gmail, Facebooks, Twitter, Amazon AWS, and many more.

Chrome Extensions: PHP Console and JavaScript Errors Notifier

Here are a couple of handy Google Chrome extensions that I came across the other day.

PHP Console

PHP Console can display PHP errors and var dumps in the Google Chrome Developer Console and notification popups. It can also execute PHP code remotely, with the help of this server side library.

JavaScript Errors Notifier

JavaScript Errors Notifier lets you know of any JavaScript errors either with an icon highlight, or with a popup window. This makes things a lot easier to notice.

The HTML we never had

The HTML we never had” is an interesting look at some features of HTML, that weren’t implemented, but could have been easily done, and if they were, how different the modern web development would be.

I agree that the “src” attribute makes a lot of sense for tags other than just images and videos.

Why I’m done with Chrome


Mathew Green shares his reasons for leaving the Google Chrome development team.  I recommend reading the whole thing, but here’s a quote from the “What’s changed?” part:

A few weeks ago Google shipped an update to Chrome that fundamentally changes the sign-in experience. From now on, every time you log into a Google property (for example, Gmail), Chrome will automatically sign the browser into your Google account for you. It’ll do this without asking, or even explicitly notifying you. (However, and this is important: Google developers claim this will not actually start synchronizing your data to Google — yet. See further below.)

Your sole warning — in the event that you’re looking for it — is that your Google profile picture will appear in the upper-right hand corner of the browser window. I noticed mine the other day:

 

 

The div that looks different in every browser


Martijn Cuppens tweets the link to this code snippet and a screenshot of how the code renders in different browsers.  Yup.  Each browser produces a different result.  The Twitter thread has more examples.

This is yet another example of how CSS and cross-browser compatibility can drive a web developer insane.