Firefox add-ons: Firefox Multi-Account Containers

I’ve been using Google Chrome as my primary and only browser for years now. But this particular Firefox add-on – Firefox Multi-Account Containers – makes me seriously consider switching back to Firefox again.

Firefox Multi-Account Containers lets you keep parts of your online life separated into color-coded tabs that preserve your privacy. Cookies are separated by container, allowing you to use the web with multiple identities or accounts simultaneously.

This is pure gold for anyone who works with multiple accounts on any given site. Examples: Gmail, Facebooks, Twitter, Amazon AWS, and many more.

Chrome Extensions: PHP Console and JavaScript Errors Notifier

Here are a couple of handy Google Chrome extensions that I came across the other day.

PHP Console

PHP Console can display PHP errors and var dumps in the Google Chrome Developer Console and notification popups. It can also execute PHP code remotely, with the help of this server side library.

JavaScript Errors Notifier

JavaScript Errors Notifier lets you know of any JavaScript errors either with an icon highlight, or with a popup window. This makes things a lot easier to notice.

Chrome Extension : var_masterpiece – turn PHP var_dump() into a thing of beauty


var_masterpiece

Var Masterpiece is a Google Chrome add-on, which formats PHP var_dump() output into something much more beautiful and useful.  You can customize the type colors and a few other things in the extension options, once installed.

Ask Slashdot: Best Browser Extensions — 2016 Edition


Slashdot is running a discussion thread on what are the best browser extensions these days.  The comments cover a variety of browsers and all kinds of extensions.  The most popular are, of course, well know.  But there are a few gems here and there.

snooze_panel

For me personally, I’ve picked the Tab Snooze extension.  I’ve tried quite a few tab management solutions, and neither one of them fits my needs even though most tried (I want to run a single browser window, with dozens or hundreds of tabs open, but I want them to be organized into groups and hidden until later, when I need them).   Tab Snooze approaches the problem from a slightly different angle. It sets the reminder for when to reopen the tab, and once that’s done, it closes the tab.  You can find all snoozed tabs and open them before the due date, of course.

This works surprisingly well for me.  If only I could control the opening of the tabs with something like “17 tabs were woken up and are about to be open. Continue?”.  Currently, I get the notification and the tabs are open automatically, which is often not at the best time.  Waking up a lot of tabs can slow the system down a bit and get in the way of things on which I’m working at the time.

Chrome apps … mind blown!


Don’t ask me how, but I’ve ended up in the Google Chrome Web Store, where I spent the last three hours – especially in the Productivity -> Developer Tools category.  I knew, there were plenty of apps to make Chrome OS / Chrome Browser super awesome, but it seems it’s been a while since I looked in there … My mind is officially blown!

I don’t need much from my Fedora laptop – a browser, a terminal, and some instant messaging apps.  But these days apparently that’s too much.  A lot of the things I do through the regular day can be handled right from the browser apps.

mysql

Here are some examples.

  1. Text editors.  There is a slew of them!  Simple and complex, specialized and generic, fast and … not so much.  Have a look at Caret for example.  It’s Sublime-like editor, based on the Ace editing component.  It offers a selection of themes, syntax highlighting for all the major languages, multiple tabs, project settings, and more!
  2. SSH client.  Yup, that’s right.  You can connect to your remote servers right out of the browser, using, for example, ServerAuditor.
  3. MySQL clients.  Choose between a simple command-line one, like MySQL Console.  Or a full-featured one, with ERDs and database browser, like Chrome MySQL Admin.
  4. Git, GitHub, and Gist tools.  Which there is a variety of…
  5. Web server (yes, really, a web server running in the web browser!) – Web Server fro Chrome, debugger (Xdebug), and compiler (Compiler.work).

Most of these offer session saving, networking synchronization, Google Drive data saving, social network integration, etc.

Wow!  The browser world has come a long way since Netscape 3 …