IMDb : The new design

IMDb is widely known for two things: the overwhelming size of its movie database, and the fact that it never changes the way it looks.

Well, guess what, IMDb update its look and feel, and it’s not a minor change. It’s fast, it’s functional, and it no longer looks like it was built 20 years ago.

The funny thing is that while I was looking for a blog post announcing the changes, I came across this one from 2009. I haven’t realized that it was from 2009 until I saw the screenshots.

Some time ago the incredible happened: our beloved movie database site IMDb finally realized that it was not 1996 anymore and dared to hire some designers in order to – you won’t believe it – change the design of the page! When I visited the site the other day, I couldn’t believe my eyes

And just so that we keep the history, here are a couple of screenshots of how it used to look:

Great job IMDb! Even if it’ll take all of us a bit to get used to the new design. At least we know it’ll last another decade.

Interpretation of NTFS Timestamps

Interpretation of NTFS Timestamps” is a fascinating technical dive into the NTFS filesystem and the way it stores file and directory timestamps. Let me just leave you with this quote:

NTFS file timestamps, according to the documentation of the ‘FILETIME’ data structure in the Windows Software Development Toolkit, is a  “64-bit value representing the number of 100-nanosecond intervals since January 1, 1601 (UTC)”.

WTF?

Earthquakes of the 20th Century


National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has this excellent visualization of the earthquakes recorded between January 1, 1901 and Decemeber 31, 2000. Each earthquake is shown as a circle, where the size indicates the strength and the color indicates the depth. Interesting, how most of these make up lines, showing the tectonic plate borders.

Unix History Repository

Evolution of unix-history-repo (Gource Visualization) video shows how the UNIX operating system was born and how it matured over time. The video is based on this GitHub repository, which combines the following:

The project has achieved its major goal with the establishment of a continuous timeline from 1970 until today. The repository contains:
– snapshots of PDP-7, V1, V2, V3, V4, V5, V6, and V7 Research Edition,
– Unix/32V,
– all available BSD releases,
– the CSRG SCCS history,
– two releases of 386BSD,
– the 386BSD patchkit,
– the FreeBSD 1.0 to 1.1.5 CVS history,
– an import of the FreeBSD repository starting from its initial imports that led to FreeBSD 2.0, and
– the current FreeBSD repository.
The files appear to be added in the repository in chronological order according to their modification time, and large parts of the source code have been attributed to their actual authors.

This is mind-blowing! So much work, so many people, so little recognition. The world wouldn’t be the same without all that, and yet the masses think that Steve Jobs or Bill Gates were the greatest computer geniuses in the history of mankind. Sad…

But the video is beautiful. It desperately needs some music though.