Social Media Research Toolkit

Social Media Research Toolkita list of 50+ social media research tools curated by researchers at the Social Media Lab at Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University. The kit features tools that have been used in peer-reviewed academic studies. Many tools are free to use and require little or no programming. Some are simple data collectors such as tweepy, a Python library for collecting Tweets, and others are a bit more robust, such as Netlytic, a multi-platform (Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram) data collector and analyzer, developed by our lab. All of the tools are confirmed available and operational.

Via Four short links: 14 Feb 2017.

How to change your Twitter username

I’m not considering a change of my Twitter account, as I’m using my surname all over the place and the only person it ever conflicts with is my brother.  But I’ve heard of people trying to rename their accounts or re-brand their activity on Twitter, so I think is article – How to change your Twitter username – is useful.

Here’s a synopsis:

  • create a new Twitter account with a @JunkName handle you don’t care about
  • change your @OldName account to @NewName, keeping your followers and tweet history intact (releasing your @OldName into the wild)
  • use the new Twitter account you made to quickly grab @OldName before anyone else has a chance to take it

One thing to note: Because of the way Twitter handles conversations, changing your username won’t retroactively change @mentions directed toward you from other people. This means that people you’ve conversed with will seemingly be talking to a ghost at @OldName instead of you at @NewName. Considering the “in-the-now” nature of Twitter this isn’t really a showstopper, just a mild inconvenience that’ll lessen over time.

How to Choose the Right Domain Name

First Site Guide runs a good article on how to choose the right domain name.  I mostly agree with it, except for maybe this part:

No numbers or hyphens
Numbers and hyphens (especially hyphens) cause confusion. Stay away from them at all costs. Even something as clever as the number1website.com will cause confusion. Make the name speak for itself.

Especially the part about hyphens.  Ideally, I’d say you should use a single word domain.  But if you do have two or more words, use hyphens.  Hyphens act as separators, much like spaces, and make your domain more readable.  Have a look at these domains and imagine them hyphened – that’d be a totally different story, don’t you think?

It’s Official: Google Says More Searches Now On Mobile Than On Desktop

Search Engine Land reports:

Last year we heard informal statements from several Google employees that mobile search queries would probably overtake desktop queries some time this year. Google just confirmed this has now happened.

The company says that “more Google searches take place on mobile devices than on computers in 10 countries including the US and Japan.” The company declined to elaborate further on what the other countries were, how recently this change happened or what the relative volumes of PC and mobile search queries are now.

[…]

Google groups tablets with desktops. So this is just smartphones and does not include tablets.

There’s also an interesting misalignment of this report with some Comscore reports.