The coolest tech CV ever

This TravisCI blog post welcomes AJ to the team.  In it, there is a bit that caught my attention (except, of course, the one about bra burning):

If you’re so inclined, you can follow her on Twitter or run curl cv.soulshake.net.

Wait a second … A what? curl for the CV?  I had to try it out.  Here’s an even better way, for reading all the slides:

p=1; while [ $p -lt 9 ]; do curl -N cv.soulshake.net/$((p++)); read; done

Oh. My. God. Lo and behold, this is the coolest tech CV I’ve ever seen. Ever. Period.  TravisCI is so lucky to have her!

P.S.: If you are interested in how this was done, here a couple of blog posts – one and two.

UI Museum: Norton Commander 5.0

Norton Commander

Ilya Birman has a massive blog post “UI Museum: Norton Commander 5.0” with almost 60 screenshots (!!!) and user interface feature descriptions of Norton Commander – an icon tool that was used by a whole generation of PC users in the DOS and early Windows era.

Norton Commander was so popular that is spawned a number of other projects that brought similar functionality to other operating systems (Midnight Commander for Linux), later versions of Windows (Far, Total Commander), and even other file management tools (FileZilla, CutFTP) and more.

Good old times…

Dephpugger – PHP debugger for the command line

DePHPugger is an easy to use debugger for PHP, which works from the command line and can also be integrated with any IDE or editor.  Here is a GIF screencast that demonstrates the functionality:

There are more demos in the project’s GitHub repository. You can also read this article and watch this video.

5 Fancy Reasons and 7 Funky Uses for the AWS CLI

5 Fancy Reasons and 7 Funky Uses for the AWS CLI has a few good examples of AWS CLI usage:

  1. AWS CLI Multiple Profiles
  2. AWS CLI Autocomplete
  3. Formatting AWS CLI Output
  4. Filtering AWS CLI Output
  5. Using Waiters in the AWS CLI
  6. Using Input Files to Commands
  7. Using Roles to Access Resources

There also a few useful links in the article, so make sure you at least scroll through it.

A Practical Guide to Linux Commands, Editors, and Shell Programming

I came across the second edition of the Prentice Hall’s “A Practical Guide to Linux Commands, Editors, and Shell Programming” by Mark G. Sobell (original link).  This is a rather lengthy book at just over 1,000 pages, covering everything from history of Linux and basic commands, all the way to bash, Perl, and sed, and how things work both on the inside and outside.

It’s probably not one of those books to read from cover to cover, but quite handy to keep as a reference and flip a few pages once in a while.

What Is WP-CLI? A Beginner’s Guide

WP-CLI is a super useful tool, which I use on a daily basis, and I wish more people knew about.  Gladly, there is now “What Is WP-CLI? A Beginner’s Guide“, which explains what it is, how to install it, how to use it, and where to go from there.

Linux utils that you might not know

Linux utils that you might not know covers a few Linux command line utilities that aren’t very famous:

  • column, for “columnating” lists, which is very useful for display of table-like data (think CSV, for example);
  • cal, for displaying calendars;
  • factor, for calculating factors;
  • numfmt, for formatting numbers and converting them to/from human-readable formats;
  • shred, for overwriting the content of a deleted file, making it much more difficult to recover.

Writing systemd Units

Vidar Hokstad explains what systemd units are and how to write them.  Very useful for that day when I will stop hating systemd and will try to embrace it.

Systemd has become the defacto new standard init for Linux-based systems. While not everyone has made the switch yet, pretty much all the major distros have made the decision to switch.

For most people this has not meant all that much yet, other than a lot of controversy. Systemd has built in SysV init system compatibility, and so it’s possible to avoid dealing with it quite well.

But there is much to be gained from picking up some basics. Systemd is very poweful.

I’m not going to deal with the basics of interacting with systemd as that’s well covered elsewhere. You can find a number of basic tips and tricks here.

Instead I want to talk about how to write systemd units.

Deprecated Linux networking commands and their replacements

Doug Vitale Tech Blog runs a post with a collection of the deprecated Linux networking commands and their replacements. Pretty handy if you want update some of your old bash scripts.

Deprecated command Replacement command(s)
arp ip n (ip neighbor)
ifconfig ip a (ip addr), ip link, ip -s (ip -stats)
iptunnel ip tunnel
iwconfig iw
nameif ip link, ifrename
netstat ss, ip route (for netstat-r), ip -s link (for netstat -i), ip maddr (for netstat-g)
route ip r (ip route)