Red Hat to Acquire CoreOS

Red Hat issued a press release announcing that it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire CoreOS Inc.

RALEIGH, N.C. —  — Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire CoreOS, Inc., an innovator and leader in Kubernetes and container-native solutions, for a purchase price of $250 million, subject to certain adjustments at closing that are not expected to be material. Red Hat’s acquisition of CoreOS will further its vision of enabling customers to build any application and deploy them in any environment with the flexibility afforded by open source. By combining CoreOS’s complementary capabilities with Red Hat’s already broad Kubernetes and container-based portfolio, including Red Hat OpenShift, Red Hat aims to further accelerate adoption and development of the industry’s leading hybrid cloud platform for modern application workloads.
I find it to be very significant.  Have a look at other Red Hat acquisitions, especially lately, as well as their other programs and projects.

How did you significantly reduce your AWS cost?

This Hacker News thread is full of tips, tricks, and references to reducing Amazon AWS costs.  There is plenty of good advice from cleaning up the data and releasing unused resources, to monitoring the reserved instances usage, to moving data from elastic volumes to the Amazon S3 for cheaper storage and smaller traffic bills.

Persisting state between AWS EC2 spot instances

Persisting state between AWS EC2 spot instances” is a handy guide into using Amazon EC2 spot instances instead of on-demand or reserved instances and preserving the state of the instance between terminations.  This is not something that I’ve personally tried yet, but with the ever-growing number of instances I managed on the AWS, this definitely looks like an interesting approach.

The Evolution of a Static Website

Next month I’m giving a talk on the evolution of the deployment tools and processes in the last couple of decades.  This article is going along the same lines but over a much shorter period of time and only covering the static websites, not web applications.  Still quite impressive as to how far and how fast the technology is changing.

MailChimp vs. Amazon SES + Mailwizz

Here’s an interesting story of moving away from MailChimp to a combined setup of Amazon SES and MailWizz, which resulted in overall 92% reduction of the monthly bill.  Given it’s not the same functionality, but if you are technical enough and your requirements are simpler than all the functionality of the MailChimp, this looks like a good alternative.

AWS Application Load Balancer

I found this visual primer to the Application Load Balancing on the Amazon AWS quite interesting.  Application Load Balancing is not something I am using just yet, but it’s getting there.  With more and more services and pricing schemas available from Amazon, explaining things simply is not as easy as it may seem.

Database Popularity Index

Have a look at Red9’s Database Popularity Index, which is updated now on a monthly basis.  Last year I blogged about a similar study.

One thing that is still mind-boggling to me is the total number of different database engines – over 300!  I know there is a constant need for better and more powerful databases, but 300?  Sounds like too much to choose from.

One other thing that I find slightly surprising is the popularity of the Microsoft Access.  Really?  With so much to choose from, people still stay with Access?  What am I not getting here?

How we designed our Kubernetes infrastructure on AWS

How we designed our Kubernetes infrastructure on AWS” is a case study of how Atlassian (the kind people behind BitBucket, HipChat, Jira, and a few other popular tools) setup their infrastructure on Amazon AWS.

With all the popularity of the cloud in general and AWS in particular, there is still not enough articles like this one.

AWS Adds Descriptions to Security Group Rules

AWS Blog lets us know that Amazon has finally implemented one of the most useful features ever – descriptions on Security Groups rules.  Previously, one could provide a description to the Security Group only, for example: “Proxy Server Access”.  Which wasn’t very useful, as it was almost obvious.  But now one can add a description to every rule inside the Security Group.  So when you have a Security Group with a bunch of IP address ranges, you can now describe each one of them.  For example: “HQ Office”, “UK Office”, “Boss At Home”, etc.

The AWS spend of a SaaS side-business

As someone who went through a whole pile of trying and error with Amazon AWS, I strongly recommend reading anything you can on the subject before you start moving your business to the cloud (not even necessarily Amazon, but any vendor), and while you have it running there.  “The AWS spend of a SaaS side-business” is a good one in that category.