The story of a 44 year old bug … still alive today

If there’s only one thing you’ll read online today, make it this one.  Yes, it’s a rant.  But it’s brilliant.  It talks about an annoying bug in the Windows 10, which is still here today, in 2018, yet which routes from a decision made back 1974.  Love it!

croc – simple and secure cross-platform file transfer

croc is a very simple but super useful utility, which helps with occasional file transfers between two computers. When you need to send a few files to a friend on another computer or in another country – this might just be the easiest way.  No need to setup HTTP or FTP servers, Samba or NFS shares, or register at one of the million web services that provide such functionality.

croc is written in Go and is compiled for a variety of operating systems, include Linux, Windows, and macOS.  It even has a simple GUI for those who wants it.

Windows Notepad Finally Supports Unix, Mac OS Line Endings

This Slashdot story links to this blog post by Microsoft.  33 years later, one of the most annoying issues with the Notepad text editor is resolved:

Starting with the current Windows 10 Insider build, Notepad will support Unix/Linux line endings (LF), Macintosh line endings (CR), and Windows Line endings (CRLF) as usual. New files created within Notepad will use Windows line ending (CRLF) by default, but it will now be possible to view, edit, and print existing files, correctly maintaining the file’s current line ending format.

They shouldn’t have invented their own line ending in the first place.  But it’s great to see that they finally acknowledge the existence of the rest of the world.

Understanding AD Access Control Entries

Understanding AD Access Control Entries” is a quick and simple article describing some of the madness of the Active Directory access control entities.  This is particularly useful for those of us who had to deal with Active Directory, without having much experience with MS Windows.  I’m sure this will come handy again in the future.

Winamp2-js – implementation of Winamp 2.9 in HTML5 and JavaScript

Atwood’s Law states that any application that can be written in JavaScript, will eventually be written in JavaScript.  Winamp2-js is yet another example supporting this law.  It is a re-implementation of Winamp 2.9, a classic Windows MP3 player from decades ago, done in HTML5 and JavaScript.

The source code is on GitHub and a live demo is available here.