Headless CMS: REST vs JSON:API vs GraphQL

Headless CMS: REST vs JSON:API vs GraphQL” is an interesting comparison of the REST, JSON:API, and GraphQL:

In this blog post, we will compare REST, JSON:API and GraphQL. First, we’ll look at an architectural, CMS-agnostic comparison, followed by evaluating some Drupal-specific implementation details.

WordPress 5.0

WordPress 5.0 has been released today.  It is by far the largest update to the system since … since I can remember.  In fact, to some, it might look like a completely different system, thanks to a totally new editing experience – Gutenberg.

I have already upgraded this blog to the new version, and I’m writing this post with the new editor.  It is awesome!  It’ll take some getting used, but not because it’s difficult, rather because I’ve been using WordPress for too long.

I also can’t wait to see what all the creative people will come up with in their themes and plugins, pushing WordPress websites to the new high.

Great work and huge thanks to everyone involved!

WordPress : Getting Ready for Gutenberg


Here are some very exciting news from the WordPress fronts: WordPress 5 will feature the built-in Gutenberg project.  Gutenberg is a complete rebuilt of the WordPress administration and content publishing experience, with much faster and cleaner user interface and a whole array of new features, such as “page builder” functionality.

Here are a couple of links with more information on how to get yourself ready in time:

Grav – a modern open source flat-file CMS


Grav is yet another addition to the growing number of the Open Source flat-file content management systems.  I guess, more and more people are realizing that not every website needs a database behind it.  And those that do need one, will have to work hard to keep it flexible and scaleable.

Grav brings a user friendly interface, lots of features, and extendability with themes and plugins.  Give it a spin!

Morten Rand-Hendriksen: Gutenberg and the WordPress of Tomorrow


If you are working with WordPress in any capacity, you have to watch this talk.  Or at least the first 25 minutes (before the Q&A).  If you are involved with web publishing or web design, you have to watch it.  If you are a web enthusiast, you have to watch it.   If you are not involved with the web at all, you definitely have to watch it, as you’ll have an idea of where things are going, and you might decide to get involved.

Just watch it!

WordPress 4.9 Field Guide


WordPress 4.9 is just around the corner (scheduled for release tomorrow, November 14th).  This version brings an impressive number of new features and improvements.  The stats so far are:

Roughly 400 bugs, 181 enhancements, 7 feature requests, and 42 blessed tasks have been marked as closed in WordPress 4.9.

Figuring out all these changes and how they affect you is an effort in itself.  But don’t you worry!  Here’s the WordPress 4.9 Field Guide, which showcases all the main changes and provides plenty of additional resources to follow up.

Wow!  WordPress 4.9 packs quit a punch!

WordPress now powers 27.1% of all websites on the Internet


wordpress-market-share

WordPress Tavern states:

WordPress now powers 27.1% of all websites on the internet, up from 25% last year. While it may seem that WordPress is neatly adding 2% of the internet every year, its percentage increase fluctuates from year to year and the climb is getting more arduous with more weight to haul.

Linking to these statistics from W3Techs.  Impressive!

Those who think that WordPress is just a blogging system are far from the truth…

WordPress : Preferred Languages Research


Pascal Birchler of the WordPress blogs some interesting research he did in the area of handling preferred language and how different systems – ranging from browsers, wikis, and social networks to all kinds of content management systems – approach and solve the problem.

drupal-language-hierarchy-module

Drupal

Drupal 8 has a rather powerful user interface text language detection mechanism. There is a per session, per user and per browser option in the detection settings. However, users can only choose one language, so they cannot say (in core at least) that they want German primarily and Spanish if German is not available. But the language selected by the user is part of the larger fallback system, so it may fall back further down to other options.

The Language fallback module allows defining one fallback for a language, while the Language Hierarchy module provides a GUI to change the language fallback system. It allows setting up language hierarchies where translations of a site’s content, settings and interface can fall back to parent language translations, without ever falling back to English. This module might be the most interesting one for our research.

Apart from the research itself, I think this is an interesting example of how complex some seemingly simple features are.