Intro to basic web application security

Intro to basic web application security” is an excellent overview of the most common mistakes web developers make when it comes to security. The article provides practical examples (including code snippets and screenshots), which illustrate the problems and ways to solve them. The list includes:

  • SQL injection (of course! no such guide would be complete without it)
  • Cross-site scripting (XSS)
  • Cross-site Request Forgery (CSRF/XSRF)
  • Local file inclusion (LFI)
  • Insufficient password hashing
  • Man in the middle (MITM)
  • Command injection
  • XML external entity (XXE)
  • Sensitive data exposure (including error messages and exceptions)
  • Login rate limits
  • and a variety of other, small, but potentially dangerous issues.

Refactoring.Guru : Design Patterns + PHP

Refactoring.Guru is a great resource for learning about refactoring best practices and design patterns. A lot of the website’s content is also available as Dive into Design Patterns ebook.

Today I came across this GitHub repository, which makes this resource even better specifically for PHP developers. Yup, that’s right, the GitHub repository features all code examples written in PHP 7.3, making it super easy to jump into coding.

And if you aren’t a PHP developer, have a look at the other repositories, which do the same for a few other programming languages.

AWS CloudFormation Sample Templates

awslabs/aws-cloudformation-templates is an extensive collection of Amazon AWS CloudFormation templates for a wide range of resources and services. Some of these can be used as is for deploying production infrastructure, others are good starting points for those of us who are still learning.

How To Speed Up The Code Review

How To Speed Up The Code Review” is a collection of excellent tips and strategies on how to make your Pull Requests easier to review. These work equally well for Open Source projects and for proprietary repositories.

The gist of this article is: don’t make large pull requests, and don’t mix different types of changes within the same pull request. Read the whole thing for suggestions on how to actually do that.

Semantic Versioning – why you should care

Semantic Versioning – why you should care” is a nice take on Semantic Versioning and how and why people should is. I particularly liked the practical examples of changes and which version bump they correspond to.

I frequently find myself explaining the Semantic Versioning to developers, and going over some example changes. Now I can just send the link to that article instead and safe myself some time.

Very nicely done!