How the Internet works

cable

Ars Technica runs a nice overview article “How the Internet works: Submarine fiber, brains in jars, and coaxial cables“.  It features plenty of cool images, statistics, and details of the Internet wiring from under the sea to the last mile to the last 100 meters.  It’s mostly focused on UK, but it provides a good understanding of what’s involved in the modern day connectivity.

P.S.: On a less serious note, here’s The IT Crowd take on how the Internet works.  Thanks to Maxym Balabaev for a reminder.

21st century is finally here with PrimeTel Fibernet

The apartment building where I live in for the last few years had some cabling issues.  That prevented me from joining the rest of the world in the 21st century, when it comes to home Internet connectivity.  Here’s what I’ve been on until today:

PrimeTel (before)

Today, I’ve got my connection updated.  PrimeTel Fibernet, which is currently only available to select buildings, brought the modern age of technology into my house.  Here’s how it looks:

PrimeTel (after)

Yup, that’s a 50 Mbps download with 8 Mbps upload connection.  Nearly a 10x speed increase, but not only that.  Have a look at 1 ms ping now vs. 35 ms ping before.  And that all is for the same price.  And nothing else had to change – I still have the same TV channels and the same landline number.  Ah, no, wait, my home IP address changed, but who cares about that, right?

This thing is so far indeed, that to fully utilize it I need to use the Ethernet cable.  Gladly, that’s how both my PlayStation 3 and the home media server are connected.  With my laptop’s WiFi, I get the numbers like this:

PrimeTel (WiFi)

I’m not yet sure why, but I’ll probably need to look into my wireless card drivers or something.

Anyways, WiFi or not, it’s way faster than it used to be, both in bandwidth and latency.  Which are amazing news!

P.S.: Thanks to SpeedTest.net for cool graphics and years in service too.

Global Internet Map 2012

internet map

I came across “Global Internet Map 2012” – an interactive map by TeleGeography, via this article (in Russian).  If you read the language, check the article for more maps and resources on the subject.  Also check my previous posts here and here.

Apart from the absolute visual awesomeness, one thing that struck me in particular is how weird the world looks if you just rotate the map a bit.

The Rise and Fall of .Ly

Jon Postel

The Rise and Fall of .Ly” covers some of the not so widely known Internet history, including The God of the Internet, Jon Postel:

Until 1998, the Internet had a “God.” His name was Jon Postel.

Postel was a computer science student at UCLA in the late 1960s. In 1969, he got into the Internet more or less on the ground floor, when he was part of the team that set up the first node of the ARPANET — which would lay the technological groundwork for the modern Internet.

In these early days, computers would refer to each other and the files on them by IP address. The earliest web addresses were strings of numbers, like: 123.45.67.89. If you wanted to reference, access, or communicate with a computer, you’d type in its numerical address. As the ARPANET grew, its moderators compiled a single file mapping memorable names, often pronounceable strings of characters, to IP addresses. This file was named “HOSTS.TXT”, and it was like a giant phone book with every computer’s name and number in it. Hosts made copies of the master HOSTS.TXT. This system got more and more cumbersome as the network got bigger and bigger.

In 1983, ARPANET became a subnet of the early Internet. At around the same time, Postel, along with computer scientist Paul Mockapetris, devised a new system to name the various places of the web. Their invention, called the Domain Name System (DNS), took the role of the HOSTS.TXT file and distributed it across an eventually vast, multifaceted network of servers.

Happy birthday, IMDb!

imdb

According to Wikipedia, Internet Movie Database, or IMDb, as we know it, has turned 25 years old (launched on October 17, 1990).  What an achievement!  There aren’t that many websites around that are that old and still that useful.

I would like to take this opportunity to wish a very Happy Birthday to everyone who was involved with the site during all this years.  Thank you!

I hope one day we’ll overcome all those copyright restrictions and it’ll be possible to watch movies and TV series directly on the site, much like the trailers are now.

Bitcoin is a money platform with many APIs

Bitcoin is a money platform with many APIs

Bitcoin is much more than just a digital currency. It is a protocol, a network, a currency and a transaction language. Most of all, though, it is an application programming interface (API) for money. Nowadays, bathroom scales and fridges have APIs, so why not money?

Traditional money does have APIs, but they are closed. You can program the merchant API of the VISA network if you are a trusted merchant. You can send and receive FIX messages if you are a stockbroker or exchange. Regular people, however, don’t even have APIs into their bank accounts, let alone the broader economy. Bitcoin changes all that by not only offering an API for accounts (wallets) and transactions, but also making that API available to everyone.