All 500 of the World’s Top 500 Supercomputers Are Running Linux

Slashdot shares the story:

Linux rules supercomputing. This day has been coming since 1998, when Linux first appeared on the TOP500 Supercomputer list. Today, it finally happened: All 500 of the world’s fastest supercomputers are running Linux. The last two non-Linux systems, a pair of Chinese IBM POWER computers running AIX, dropped off the November 2017 TOP500 Supercomputer list. When the first TOP500 supercomputer list was compiled in June 1993, Linux was barely more than a toy. It hadn’t even adopted Tux as its mascot yet. It didn’t take long for Linux to start its march on supercomputing.

From when it first appeared on the TOP500 in 1998, Linux was on its way to the top. Before Linux took the lead, Unix was supercomputing’s top operating system. Since 2003, the TOP500 was on its way to Linux domination. By 2004, Linux had taken the lead for good. This happened for two reasons: First, since most of the world’s top supercomputers are research machines built for specialized tasks, each machine is a standalone project with unique characteristics and optimization requirements. To save costs, no one wants to develop a custom operating system for each of these systems. With Linux, however, research teams can easily modify and optimize Linux’s open-source code to their one-off designs.

 

Fedora 27

Fedora 27Fedora 27, the latest and greatest version, has been released.  As always, a lot of work went into putting it all together.  But for personally, the new releases has stopped being exciting a long time ago.  My desktop needs have been satisfied for years.  All I need is MATE Desktop Environment (with i3 window manager), a browser, terminal emulator and Vim.  That’s pretty much it.  And it has been there forever.

So, is there anything interesting in this new version at all? Release Notes are rather thin, but let’s have a look.

  • New and improved Gnome 3.26.  I know a lot of people who use Gnome, so that’s probably exciting.
  • New LibreOffice 5.4.  Personally, I don’t know anyone who is using LibreOffice.  Google Docs is doing a pretty good job these days.
  • Security section looks like the largest area of changes.
  • Web Development section mentions Node.js 8.

If you want even more details on what has been done, why and how, have a look at the Fedora 27 changes page.

To me it looks like there is some internal restructuring and reorganization going on, with release process changes (no more Alpha releases), a lot of effort on modularity, and so on.

Hopefully, the next one will be a bit more exciting.

Amazon AWS : Scaling Up to Your First 10 Million Users

This must be one of the greatest presentations on the Amazon AWS that I’ve ever seen.  It uses a gradual approach – from small and simple to huge and complex.  It covers a whole lot of different Amazon AWS services, how they compliment each other, at which stage and scale they become useful, and more.

Even quickly jumping through the slides gave me a lot to think (and Google) about.

Firefox : The Quantum Era

Entering the Quantum Era—How Firefox got fast again and where it’s going to get faster” is an insightful article showcasing the big changes happening with the Firefox browser.  It seems, the pendulum is swinging back towards the browser that almost became irrelevant.  I think that competition is good for everyone, and it has proven much more so in the end-user applications.  New ideas, new approaches, new technologies, and plenty of stimuli for the Google Chrome and other browser teams to respond with something even better.

WordPress 4.9 Field Guide

WordPress 4.9 is just around the corner (scheduled for release tomorrow, November 14th).  This version brings an impressive number of new features and improvements.  The stats so far are:

Roughly 400 bugs, 181 enhancements, 7 feature requests, and 42 blessed tasks have been marked as closed in WordPress 4.9.

Figuring out all these changes and how they affect you is an effort in itself.  But don’t you worry!  Here’s the WordPress 4.9 Field Guide, which showcases all the main changes and provides plenty of additional resources to follow up.

Wow!  WordPress 4.9 packs quit a punch!

Player Unknown’s Battlegrounds

I’ve been a fan of  Jeff Atwood’s writing on Coding Horror for years.  But it was mostly about technology and programming.  Today, I was reading through his review of a video game – Player Unknown’s Battlegrounds – and for the first time in a really really long time, I wanted to download it and start playing even before I finished reading his post.

That reminded me of how gaming reviews and guides were done back in the 90’s – not by professional content managers and editors, but by people who had a passion.  Learn from that, the gaming industry.  Learn from that, everyone else!

GitHub : Archiving Repositories

GitHub archive repositories

Last week, GitHub introduced archiving of repositories. While it might not seem like a news worthy feature, it is quite useful for both individuals and teams.  Two particular scenarios that I find helpful are:

  1. Indicate that a particular repository / project is obsolete and is not maintained.  This should save quite a bit of time for people who randomly end up on a project’s page, via searching GitHub/Packagist/Google or somewhere else.
  2. Provide an insight into how many of the person’s or team’s profile are active.  It’s often difficult to estimate at a first glance, when looking at a GitHub profile of a person or a team who have been developing for a long time, how many of their projects are actually actively maintained.

Easily optimize images using PHP

Via this blog post I came across this PHP image optimization library, which somewhat reminds me of this blog post from a couple of years ago.  As good as ImageMagick is, it takes time and effort to find all the right options.  With Spatie Image Optimizer you have an almost out of the box solution for optimizing images in a variety of formats.

This package can optimize PNGs, JPGs, SVGs and GIFs by running them through a chain of various image optimization tools.

Best Automation Testing Tools for 2018 (Top 10 reviews)

best testing tools

Here is a nice review of the top 10 best automation testing tools circa 2018.  It covers the following:

  1. Selenium
  2. Katalon Studio
  3. Unified Functional Testing (UFT)
  4. Watir
  5. IBM Rational Functional Tester (RFT)
  6. TestComplete
  7. TestPlant eggPlant
  8. Tricentis Tosca
  9. Ranorex
  10. Robot framework

If you are just setting up the QA team or department and want to know what’s new and hot, or old and tested in the world of automated testing, have a look at these tools.

Interviewing astronauts

Here a couple of recent Q&As with astronauts.  First comes the interview with Scott Kelly, with a whole bunch of questions around his time in space.  And secondly, a few tongue in cheek answers from several space men and women.  I found this answer by Barry Wilmore particularly entertaining:

“You never know true beauty until you see Earth from space, or true terror until you hear someone knocking on the space station door from outside. You look through the porthole and see an astronaut, but all your crew is inside and accounted for. You use the comm to ask who it is and he says he’s Ramirez returning from a repair mission, but Ramirez is sitting right next to you in the command module and he’s just as confused as you are. When you tell the guy this over the radio he starts banging on the door louder and harder, begging you to let him in, saying he’s the real Ramirez. Meanwhile, the Ramirez inside with you is pleading to keep the airlock shut. It really puts life on Earth into perspective.”