100 Social Media Facts and Statistics for 2015

Social-Media-Facts-Statistics

Back in 2013 I linked to some (not so) surprising facts about social media.  Two years is a lot of time and a lot of things has changed since.  So here comes 100 social media facts and statistics for 2015.  These spread from general statistics to service-specific ones, including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest, Google+, and others.  Unlike many other similar collections, this one actually links to sources for every single fact, and provides an easy one-click share to Twitter button.  Here are a few to get you started:

  • 189 million Facebook users are ‘mobile only’.
  • There are 4 billion daily video views on Facebook.
  • 50% of unique LinkedIn visitors access it via mobile.
  • There is a 50% average increase in comments when a LinkedIn page post contains a question.
  • Over 40 billion photos have been shared on Instagram.
  • Google+ has 300 million monthly active users around the world.
  • Google+ grows at a rate of 33% each year.
  • Average time spent on YouTube per mobile session is 40 minutes.
  • There are 300 hours of video uploaded to YouTube every minute.

 

Fixing Twitter

Fixing Twitter – here’s a reasonable rant on what’s wrong with Twitter and how to fix it.  Product managers and marketing people should definitely read.

Second–and this one is obvious to almost everyone–Twitter needs to focus on realtime events. When I open Twitter during a major debate in the US, or when a bomb has exploded in Bangkok, there should be a huge fиcking banner at the top that says “follow this breaking event.” It shouldn’t just search for a hashtag–it should use intelligent algorithms to show me all of the relevant content about that event. It should be the place you go to learn about what is happening in the world right now. When something major happens in the world/your country/your city, you should be trained to immediately and automatically think, “open Twitter to get updates.” This is so obvious to me that I wonder what Twitter’s product team has been doing—are they over-designing a solution to this? It’s so simple. 90% of the UI and 80% of the search functionality is already in the app.

Message from Richard Stallman … not

I nearly had a heart attack … it took me a couple of seconds to realize that this was a prank…

Well played, well played …

P.S.: For those of you who don’t know who Richard Stallman is – shame on you. :)

P.P.S.: Easy for you to spot the “bot” part here, but I saw on this on the mobile app, which was more insisting on the name rather than the handle.

What were the technical limits that Twitter reached with Ruby on Rails?

What were the technical limits that Twitter reached with Ruby on Rails?

Quora question that has some well researched answers.  This is quite handy for any system architect or web developer.