BitBucket Pipelines and Docker for PHP Developers

I’ve been meaning to look into Docker for a long while now.  But, as always, time is the issue.  In the last couple of days though I’ve been integrating BitBucket Pipelines into our workflow.  BitBucket Pipelines is a continuous integration solution, which runs your project tests in a Docker container.  So, naturally, I had to get a better idea of how the whole thing works.

Docker for PHP Developers” article was super useful.  Even though it wasn’t immediately applicable to BitBucket Pipelines, as they don’t currently support multiple containers – everything has to run within a single container.

The default BitBucket Pipelines configuration suggests the phpunit/phpunit image.  If you want to run PHPUnit tests only, that works fine.  But if you want to have a full blown Nginx and MySQL setup for extra bits (UI tests, integration tests, etc), then you might find smartapps/bitbucket-pipelines-php-mysql image much more useful.  Here’s the full bitbucket-pipelines.yml file that I’ve ended up with.

git: history of a source code line

git is one of those tools that no matter how much you know about it, there is an infinite supply of new things to learn.  Here’s a handy bit I’ve discovered recently, thanks to this StackOverflow comment:

Since Git 1.8.4, git log has -L to view the evolution of a range of lines.

[…]

And you want to know the history of what is now line 155.

Then, use git log. Here, -L 155,155:git-web–browse.sh means “trace the evolution of lines 155 to 155 in the file named git-web–browse.sh“.

Absolutely brilliant!  I used to suffer through this via an iteration of git blame and git show to the point of custom bash scripts.

StackOverflow: Docker vs. Vagrant, with project authors’ comments

There is this discussion over at StackOverflow: Should I use Vagrant or Docker for creating an isolated environment? It attracted the attention of the authors of both projects (as well as many other smart people).  Read the whole thing for interesting insights into what’s there now and what’s coming.  If you’d rather have a summary, here it is:

The short answer is that if you want to manage machines, you should use Vagrant. And if you want to build and run applications environments, you should use Docker.

What is risk management?

risk management

O’Reilly runs a nice and simple article on what is risk management.  They look at it from the perspective of a web application, but the suggestions are generic enough to be applied universally.  The highlights are:

  • Managing risk
  • Identifying risk
  • Remove worst offenders
  • Mitigate
  • Review regularly

I particularly liked this paragraph from the identifying risks section:

You will likely find that there are obvious entries in the list, but there should also be entries that surprise you. This is good. You want to uncover as many of your risk vulnerabilities as possible, and if some of them don’t come as a surprise to you, you probably haven’t dug deep enough.

Micro – a modern and intuitive terminal-based text editor

micro-solarized

Micro is a modern console based text editor, written in Go.  Version 1.0.0 has been recently released.  It’s cross-platform (installs as a single binary) and supports a variety of features:

  • Easy to use and to install
  • No dependencies or external files are needed — just the binary you can download further down the page
  • Common keybindings (ctrl-s, ctrl-c, ctrl-v, ctrl-z…)
    • Keybindings can be rebound to your liking
  • Sane defaults
    • You shouldn’t have to configure much out of the box (and it is extremely easy to configure)
  • Splits and tabs
  • Extremely good mouse support
    • This means mouse dragging to create a selection, double click to select by word, and triple click to select by line
  • Cross platform (It should work on all the platforms Go runs on)
    • Note that while Windows is supported, there are still some bugs that need to be worked out
  • Plugin system (plugins are written in Lua)
  • Persistent undo
  • Automatic linting and error notifications
  • Syntax highlighting (for over 75 languages!)
  • Colorscheme support
    • By default, micro comes with 16, 256, and true color themes.
  • True color support (set the MICRO_TRUECOLOR env variable to 1 to enable it)
  • Copy and paste with the system clipboard
  • Small and simple
  • Easily configurable
  • Common editor things such as undo/redo, line numbers, unicode support…

Although not yet implemented, I hope to add more features such as autocompletion, and multiple cursors in the future.

If you are looking for a new editor, give Micro a try.