Living Without Atomic Clocks

Living Without Atomic Clocks” is an interesting article that covers some design bits of distributed systems and CockroachDB (what a name!), especially those related to time precision.  This part in particular is the one I’m sure I’ll came back to at some point:

How does TrueTime provide linearizability?

OK, back to Spanner and TrueTime. It’s important to keep in mind that TrueTime does not guarantee perfectly synchronized clocks. Rather, TrueTime gives an upper bound for clock offsets between nodes in a cluster. Synchronization hardware helps minimize the upper bound. In Spanner’s case, Google mentions an upper bound of 7ms. That’s pretty tight; by contrast, using NTP for clock synchronization is likely to give somewhere between 100ms and 250ms.

So how does Spanner use TrueTime to provide linearizability given that there are still inaccuracies between clocks? It’s actually surprisingly simple. It waits. Before a node is allowed to report that a transaction has committed, it must wait 7ms. Because all clocks in the system are within 7ms of each other, waiting 7ms means that no subsequent transaction may commit at an earlier timestamp, even if the earlier transaction was committed on a node with a clock which was fast by the maximum 7ms. Pretty clever.

How to Synchronize WordPress Live and Development Databases

SitePoint runs through a few options that one can use to synchronize WordPress live and development databases.  I’ve linked to  some of these options before, but it’s nice to have them all conveniently together.  The solutions discussed include WordPress-specific tools:

as well as generic tools, such mysqldump, mysqlpump, rsync, and git.

Overall, it’s a pretty complete list of tools.  The one I’d like to add though is WP CLI, which allows a great deal of automation when it comes to WordPress, including things like database imports and exports, post and option management, and more.

 

Gay marriage: the database engineering perspective

Gay marriage: the database engineering perspective is a rather old article on how gay marriage (and other types of marriages) can affect technology, but somehow I missed it for all these years.

It’s interesting from a variety of perspectives – technical, social, and cultural.  It’s also somewhat tongue in cheek, yet insightful and thought-provoking.  Irrelevant of your views on the subject, I recommend this read.  Where else will you find 14 database schema designs trying to solve the same problem.

The legal ramifications of what I’m about to describe are unguessable. I have no idea what rights a civil union like the ones which would be possible below would have, nor do I have any idea what kind of transhuman universe would require so complex a system. This is the marriage database schema to take us up to the thirty-first century, people.

If databases are that difficult to adjust, I can’t even imagine the effort needed for humans…

MySQL 8 is coming

OpenSource.com covers the upcoming release of the MySQL 8.

What happened to 6 & 7?

Years ago, before the Sun Microsystems purchase of MySQL AB, there was a version of MySQL with the number 6. Sadly, it was a bit ambitious and the change of ownership left it to wither. The MySQL Cluster product has been using the 7 series for years. With the new changes for MySQL 8, developers feel they have modified it enough to bump the big number.

The new version brings a whole lot of changes to filesystem organization, indexes, faster ALTER TABLE, and more.

GitHub to MySQL

GitHub to MySQL is a handy little app in PHP that pulls labels, milestones and issues from GitHub into your local MySQL database.  This is useful for analysis and backup purposes.

There are a few example queries provided that show issues vs. pull requests, average number of days to merge a pull request over the past weeks, average number of pull requests open every day, and total number of issues.

I think this tool can be easily extended to pull other information from GitHub, such as release notes, projects, web hooks.  Also, if you are using multiple version control services, such as BitBucket and GitLab, extending this tool can help with merging data from multiple sources and cross-referencing it with the company internal tools (bug trackers, support ticketing systems, CRM, etc).

This is not something I’ll be doing now, but I’m sure the future is not too far away.

RethinkDB: why we failed

Startups are born and gone every single day.  Much more often so in technology sector.  Most of these just disappear into the ether.  RethinkDB at least leaves the useful trace of analysis of what happened and why they failed.

When we announced that RethinkDB is shutting down, I promised to write a post-mortem. I took some time to process the experience, and I can now write about it clearly.

In the HN discussion thread people proposed many reasons for why RethinkDB failed, from inexplicable perversity of human nature and clever machinations of MongoDB’s marketing people, to failure to build an experienced go-to-market team, to lack of numeric type support beyond 64-bit float. I aggregated the comments into a list of proposed failure reasons here.

Some of these reasons have a ring of truth to them, but they’re symptoms rather than causes. For example, saying that we failed to monetize is tautological. It doesn’t illuminate the reasons for why we failed.

In hindsight, two things went wrong – we picked a terrible market and optimized the product for the wrong metrics of goodness. Each mistake likely cut RethinkDB’s valuation by one to two orders of magnitude. So if we got either of these right, RethinkDB would have been the size of MongoDB, and if we got both of them right, we eventually could have been the size of Red Hat[1].

Thank you, guys.  There are valuable lessons in there.  And three points, of course:

If you remember anything about this post, remember these:

  • Pick a large market but build for specific users.
  • Learn to recognize the talents you’re missing, then work like hell to get them on your team.
  • Read The Economist religiously. It will make you better faster.

Amazon RDS and Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC)

Yesterday I helped a friend to figure out why he couldn’t connect to his Amazon RDS database inside the Amazon VPC (Virtual Private Cloud).  It was the second time someone asked me to help with the Amazon Web Services (AWS), and it was the first time I was actually helpful.  Yey!

While I do use quite a few of the Amazon Web Services, I don’t have any experience with the Amazon RDS yet, as I’m managing my own MySQL instances.  It was interesting to get my toes wet in the troubleshooting.

Here are a few things I’ve learned in the process.

Lesson #1: Amazon supports two different ways of accessing the RDS service.  Make sure you know which one you are using and act accordingly.

gs-vpc-network

If you run an Amazon RDS instance in the VPC, you’ll have to setup your networking and security access properly.  This page – Connecting to a DB Instance Running the MySQL Database Engine – will only be useful once everything else is taken care of.  It’s not your first and only manual to visit.

Lesson #2 (sort of obvious): Make sure that both your Network ACL and Security Groups allow all the necessary traffic in and out.  Double-check the IP addresses in the rules.  Make sure you are not using a proxy server, when looking up your external IP address on WhatIsMyIP.com or similar.

Lesson #3: Do not use ICMP traffic (ping and such) as a troubleshooting tool.  It looks like Amazon RDS won’t be ping-able even if you allow it in your firewalls.  Try with “telnet your-rds-end-point-server your-rds-end-point-port” (example: “telnet 1.2.3.4 3306” or with a real database client, like the command-line MySQL one.

Lesson #4: Make sure your routing is setup properly.  Check that the subnet in which your RDS instance resides has the correct routing table attached to it, and that the routing table has the default gateway (0.0.0.0/0) route configured to either the Internet Gateway or to some sort of NAT.  Chances are your subnet is only dealing with private IP range and has no way of sending traffic outside.

Lesson #5: When confused, disoriented, and stuck, assume it’s not Amazon’s fault.  Keep calm and troubleshoot like any other remote connection issue.  Double-check your assumptions.

There’s probably lesson 6 somewhere there, about contacting support or something along those lines.  But in this particular case it didn’t get to that.  Amazon AWS support is excellent though.  I had to deal with those guys twice in the last two-something years, and they were awesome.

Taking the Pain Out of MySQL Schema Changes

Taking the Pain Out of MySQL Schema Changes” covers the following approaches to deploying MySQL schema changes:

  1. Schema Change in Downtime
  2. Role Swap (cluster setup)
  3. pt-online-schema-change

The last one is the usage of pt-online-schema-change tool developed by Percona guys, as part of their Percona Toolkit – an Open Source set of command-line tools for MySQL.

Database Engines Ranking

db-engines-ranking-table

DB-Engines.com provides some insight into some of the most popular database engines (312 of them to be precise).  Nothing too surprising there – Oracle and MySQL leading the charts, but it’s nice to have the numbers and trends.

db-engines-ranking

There are, of course, many different ways how the popularity can be calculated.  Their method is based on the popularity of each engine in a variety of online outlets, from Google Search to social networks.

  • Number of mentions of the system on websites, measured as number of results in search engines queries. At the moment, we use Google, Bing and Yandex for this measurement. In order to count only relevant results, we are searching for <system name> together with the term database, e.g. “Oracle” and “database”.
  • General interest in the system. For this measurement, we use the frequency of searches in Google Trends.
  • Frequency of technical discussions about the system. We use the number of related questions and the number of interested users on the well-known IT-related Q&A sites Stack Overflow and DBA Stack Exchange.
  • Number of job offers, in which the system is mentioned. We use the number of offers on the leading job search engines Indeed and Simply Hired.
  • Number of profiles in professional networks, in which the system is mentioned. We use the internationally most popular professional networks LinkedIn and Upwork.
  • Relevance in social networks. We count the number of Twitter tweets, in which the system is mentioned.

It seems objective and representative enough to me.

Magento database maintenance

If you are running a Magento-based website, make sure you add the database maintenance script to the cron.  For example, append this to the /etc/crontab:

# Magento log maintenance, as per
# https://docs.nexcess.net/article/how-to-perform-magento-database-maintenance.html
0 23 * * 0 root (cd /var/www/html/mysite.com && php -f shell/log.php clean)

Thanks to this page, obviously.  You’ll be surprised how much leaner your database will be, especially if you get any kind of traffic to the site.  Your database backups will also appreciate the trim.