Programming and Greek

One thought that cracks me up every now and then is about Greek programmers.  In Greek language, instead of a question mark a semicolon is used.

Greek

In many programming languages, a semicolon is used to represent the end of statement.  So, this:

$a = $b + $c;
print $a;

to Greek programmers must be looking like this:

$a = $b + $c?
print $a?

I don’t know about you, but to me this would be a constant confidence issue.  It’s almost like I’m not sure what I’m going and asking the computer to confirm.

I’m sure though they have their ways of working around this …

By the way, while reading through the Wikipedia article linked above, I thought that the possible origins of the question mark were quite interesting:

questio

 

That would also explain why not all the languages are using the question mark character.

Easter in Cyprus

For those of you not fortunate enough to live in Cyprus, here is a glimpse at how Easter (and other major holidays like … Sundays) are celebrated in Cyprus villages.

easter

The photo comes from this article (in Greek) which (to the best of my knowledge) tries to warn people about buying meat from non-certified butchers.  Well, guess what, all certified butchers were probably emptied out anyway.

Cost Obsessions Around the World

obsession map

Cost Obsessions Around the World

Google’s autocomplete function provides suggestions derived from common Google searches by other users. Comparing autocomplete results for searches on different countries reveals how certain places are perceived by people around the World.

Make sure to scroll through the original article for continental breakdowns.

I’m thinking these stats are somewhat off due to language variations (not everybody searches in English).

A Brief History of Beer Gardens

A Brief History of Beer Gardens

Unlike the ales that constituted all the world’s beer before the middle of the nineteenth century, the lager yeasts discovered in Bavaria at that time required a different type of fermentation. Ales — produced through the addition of top-fermenting yeast — ferment rapidly, at warm temperatures. Lagers, contrarily, depend on a slow, cool fermentation, ideally at temperatures between 45–56 degrees Fahrenheit. And after fermentation is complete, they need to be stored and aged for several months, at even cooler temperatures.

This was an era before refrigeration, however, so Bavarian brewers dug out large underground cellars for stashing the barrels while the beer “lagered.” To ensure fuller protection from the sun, they then scattered gravel over the ground and planted leafy chestnut and linden trees, which, as they grew, would provide ample shade from the sun.

Someone did the math. Shade, gravel, beer — all just off the banks of Munich’s Isar River, which provided an additional source of cooling for the beer. Put some tables and chairs outside, and start the taps. Beer garden culture was born.