UK’s ICO Guide to GDPR

Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) is the the UK’s independent authority set up to uphold information rights in the public interest, promoting openness by public bodies and data privacy for individuals.

They have published their own Guide to GDPR, which I find somewhat better than this one from the European Union.

Living conditions in Europe – material deprivation and economic strain

Share of population living in households that have difficulty or great difficulty in making ends meet, 2016 (%)

Eurostat published the results of the survey studying the living conditions across European Union. The numbers are a couple of years outdated, but I don’t think things have changed dramatically during this time.

Cross-country comparisons (see Figure 5) reveal that in 2016 more than half of the population in Croatia (51.4 %) and Cyprus (59.8 %) reported having difficulty or great difficulty in making ends meet, while this share rose to more than three fifths of the population in Bulgaria (61.7 %) and to more than three quarters of the population in Greece (76.8 %); more than half the populations of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (55.5 %; 2015 data) and Serbia (63.9 %) also faced difficulty or great difficulty in making ends meet.
On the other hand, less than 1 in 10 persons in Sweden (7.6 %), Germany (6.9 %) and Finland (also 6.9 %) reported facing difficulty or great difficulty in making ends meet; this was also the case in Norway (5.4 %).

Found via In-Cyprus.com.

The Nightmare Letter: A Subject Access Request under GDPR


The Nightmare Letter: A Subject Access Request under GDPR” article features an example worst-case scenario (or so) of a Subject Access Request (SAR) under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

On one hand, the example letter is quite extreme.  On the other – it’s quite realistic, especially given the (almost) template.

So, who’s ready for this?  And who’s laughing now?

Found via the comments to this Slashdot thread, which is also worth a read.

EU : Compensation of employees per hour worked


Eurostat reports the compensation of employees per hour worked.  This includes 28 member countries of the European Union, and the data for the last 10 years.

Cyprus stands at 14.3 EUR (that’s 2,288 EUR per month, given 40 hour working weeks) , slightly up from 13.9 EUR ten years ago.