sshrc – bring your .bashrc, .vimrc, etc. with you when you ssh

sshrc looks like a handy tool, for those quick SSH sessions to machines, where you can’t setup your full environment for whatever reason (maybe a shared account or automated templating or restricted access).  Here’s a description from the project page:

sshrc works just like ssh, but it also sources the ~/.sshrc on your local computer after logging in remotely.

$ echo "echo welcome" >> ~/.sshrc
$ sshrc me@myserver
welcome

$ echo "alias ..='cd ..'" >> ~/.sshrc
$ sshrc me@myserver
$ type ..
.. is aliased to `cd ..'

You can use this to set environment variables, define functions, and run post-login commands. It’s that simple, and it won’t impact other users on the server – even if they use sshrc too. This makes sshrc very useful if you share a server with multiple users and can’t edit the server’s ~/.bashrc without affecting them, or if you have several servers that you don’t want to configure independently.

I’ve discovered it by accident when searching through packages in the Fedora repositories. So, yes, you can install it with yum/dnf.

WordPress.vim – Vim Plugin for WordPress Development

If Vim is your editor of choice, and WordPress is something you work with on a regular basis, then check out WordPress.vim – a Vim plugin for WordPress development.

Some of the features are:

  • Auto-Completion for the WordPress API
  • WordPress Hooks Integration
  • WP-CLI Integration
  • Jump to Definition in WordPress Core
  • UltiSnips Snippets
  • Syntax Highlighting for WordPress PHP files.
  • Markdown Syntax Highlighting for readme.txt
  • PHPCS Syntax Checker integrated with WordPress Coding Standards
  • Search in Codex
  • Integration with WpSeek API.
  • Readme.txt Auto Validation.

Vim setup for PHP development

Robert Basic shares his “current Vim setup for PHP development“.  He shows how setup the Gutentags plugin, jump to definitions with CtrlP plugin, display of the current file and method in the status line, add support for PHP namespaces, improve linting with Asynchronous Lint Engine, and add support for PHPStan.

Via PHPDeveloper.

Use vimdiff as git mergetool

Ruslan Osipov has a very handy tutorial on how to setup Vim text editor as git merge tool, for resolving git conflicts.

Basically, run the following commands to tell git to use Vim as a merge tool (don’t forget the –global flag if you want it for all your projects, not just the current one):

git config merge.tool vimdiff
git config merge.conflictstyle diff3
git config mergetool.prompt false

With that, running “git mergetool” after a conflict was reported, will result in something like this:

The three way split window will show local version (–ours) on the left, the remote version (–theirs) on the right, and the base version with the conflict in the middle.  You can then get changes from one window into another using the following Vim diffget commands:

:diffg RE  " get from REMOTE
:diffg BA  " get from BASE
:diffg LO  " get from LOCAL

Awesomeness!

Check a few of Ruslan’s other vim-related articles.

dotfiles – your unofficial guide to dotfiles on GitHub

Warning: you will lose a lot of sleep if you follow the link below. :)

No matter how well you know Vim, bash, git, and a whole slew of other command line tools, I promise you, you’ll find something new, something you had no idea existed, something that will help you save hours and hours of your life by shaving off a few seconds here and there on the tasks you perform on a daily basis, in the repositories link to from this site.

I think I’ve spent most of my Sunday there and my dotfiles are so different now that I’m not sure I should commit and push them all in one go.  I think I might need to get used to the changes first.

Some of the things that I’ve found for myself:

  • PHP Integration environment for Vim (spf13/PIV).
  • myrepos – provides a mr command, which is a tool to manage all your version control repositories.
  • bash-it – a community Bash framework.
  • Awesome dotfiles – a curated list of dotfiles resources.

… and a whole lot of snippets, tips, and tricks.

P.S.: Make sure you don’t spend too much time on these things though :)

vimrcfu – shared knowledge of vimrc

Dear all contributors to vimrcfu,

thank you very much for all my sleepless nights this week.  I’ve almost forgot how my bed looks like.  On the other hand, I’ve learned a tonne and have significantly rearranged my vimrc and related files, expanding it with new bits and pieces.

The sleep I can get back.  The awesome features of Vim at my fingertips now – couldn’t have happened without you.

You rock!

Best regards,

yours truly.

VimGolf – fun way to learn Vim

VimGolfVimGolf – a quick and fun way to learn Vim text editor.  There is a whole lot of different challenges for all levels – from novice to expert – that will test your knowledge of Vim trickery.

You can also review the solutions provided by other people, from shortest to the most readable.

tagbar-phpctags : Vim plugin for PHP developeres

phpctags

If you are using Vim editor to write PHP code, you probably already know about the excellent tagbar plugin, which lists methods, variables and the like in an optional window split.  Recently, I’ve learned of an awesome phpctags-tagbar plugin, which extends and improves this functionality via a phpctags tool, which has a deeper knowledge of PHP than the classic ctags tool.

Once installed, you’ll have a more organized browser of your code, with support for namespaces, classes, interfaces, constants, and variables.

Vim 8.0 Released!

The team behind the greatest text editor of all times has release the new major version – Vim 8.0.  It’s the first major release in 10 years!  Brief overview of the changes:

  • Asynchronous I/O support, channels, JSON
  • Jobs
  • Timers
  • Partials, Lambdas and Closures
  • Packages
  • New style testing
  • Viminfo merged by timestamp
  • GTK+ 3 support
  • MS-Windows DirectX support

For a more complete list and details, have a look here.

The TL;DR summary: Vim provides a lot more power now to plugin developers, so we’ll be seeing a boost in both new functionality and old ways getting better.

Here is a mandatory Slashdot discussion with your usual Vim vs. Emacs flame.

P.S.: Emacs has recently released a major update too …