eDEX-UI – a sci-fi terminal

eDEX-UI is a science fiction terminal that runs on most operating systems. It was heavily inspired by the user interfaces in sci-fi movies, like TRON, Minority Report, and others. While it’s not very practical for the day-to-day use for anyone heavily using command line, it’s a lot of fun to run when there are non-technical people around, staring at your screen.

The installation is pretty simple:

git clone https://github.com/GitSquared/edex-ui.git
cd edex-ui
npm run install-linux
npm start

I think it works even better with a large touch screen, but I don’t have one around to try it on.

Programmer Playing Cards

I have recently blogged about the Faces of Open Source project. That’s a great initiative. But here’s another one, with a lot more practical approach – Programmer Playing Cards. It is a deck of playing cards, featuring people who influenced the world of computer programming in a variety of ways. Each card has a photo of a person, his or her name, what was the influence, and, as a nice touch, a quote from that person.

Here’s an example with Larry Wall.

More examples as well as instructions on how to get these cards are here.

Twas the Night Before Christmas — A Coder’s Dream

If you are involved with any kind of coding at all, I’m sure you’ll enjoy this remake of the “A Visit from St. Nicholas” poem.

He opened my laptop, and first installed Node
Who knew that old Santa had learned how to code,
His fingers were flying, his typing was quick,
How will I ever, repay ol’ St. Nick

Faces of Open Source

Faces of Open Source is an on-going photographic documentation of the people behind the development and advancement of the open source revolution that has transformed the technology industry.

Given the immense contribution of these people to the world around us, I find it surprising that they are so far from the celebrity status and most people in the world won’t know any of these faces.  Even people in technology sector itself, won’t probably name even half of these people by the picture alone.  For some, even the name won’t mean anything.

Kudos to this project for trying to make these faces slightly more familiar and for giving credit where credit is due.

Stack Overflow Buddy


An innocent joke on Facebook brought in something really golden – Stack Overflow Buddy.  It is a fun PHP library for all those of you who search for code examples on Stack Overflow and then copy-paste those into your projects.

Wow, how’s it work?

If you’re impressed, you should probably stop reading here.

  1. Split the camelCased function call into words
  2. Grab the top scoring PHP tagged questions with those words in the title from StackOverflow’s API
  3. Grab the top scoring answers for those questions
  4. Pull any and all code blocks from those answers
  5. Find the first code block that:
    1. Inteprets without error
    2. Contains one or more functions
    3. One of the functions has the same amount of arguments as were passed by the user
  6. Then we throw caution to the wind, eval, and call the new method!

This is absolutely brilliant!

The coolest tech CV ever


This TravisCI blog post welcomes AJ to the team.  In it, there is a bit that caught my attention (except, of course, the one about bra burning):

If you’re so inclined, you can follow her on Twitter or run curl cv.soulshake.net.

Wait a second … A what? curl for the CV?  I had to try it out.  Here’s an even better way, for reading all the slides:

p=1; while [ $p -lt 9 ]; do curl -N cv.soulshake.net/$((p++)); read; done

Oh. My. God. Lo and behold, this is the coolest tech CV I’ve ever seen. Ever. Period.  TravisCI is so lucky to have her!

P.S.: If you are interested in how this was done, here a couple of blog posts – one and two.

Web Development With Assembly


The other day I was joking with a colleague of mine about how much fun it would be to do the web development in Assembly.  All the usual stuff – pages would be super fast, and the whole subject makes it for some fun interview material, as the candidates mention Assembly pretty much on every CV.

WebDev with Assembly

And then I decided to do a quick Google search.  To my (not so great) surprise I got to hilarious this Reddit thread, which, among other things, links to MiniMagAsm, a web development framework written in Assembly.  It compiles into a native binary and can be executed as a CGI script.

I’m not going to use it any time soon, but I think it’s super cool, and way more than a simple “hello world” page that I was expecting to find.