Botwiki – an open catalog of friendly, useful, artistic online bots

Botwiki is an impressive collection of bots for a variety of social networks and collaboration tools – Twitter, Slack, Tubmlr, Facebook and Messenger, YouTube, Reddit, Telegram, Snapchat, and more.  You can browse all these by network or by category.

Here’s a random Twitter bot for you:

@holidaybot4000 is a Twitter bot that tweets holidays around the world for the given day, typically together with an image of the country’s flag.

The Internet in real time

The Internet in real time provides a visual insight into how much activity is happening on the web every second.  Counts for things like Facebook likes, tweets, and YouTube video views are updated every second, all on one page.

It fascinates me every time to see stuff like this, because, apart from the human activity in itself, I have a glimpse of an understanding of how much technology work is happening behind the scenes.

Revealed: Facebook’s internal rulebook on sex, terrorism and violence

The Guardian is covering a 100+ internal training manuals, spreadsheets, and flowcharts that they’ve seen that Facebook has for training their editorial / censorship staff.

There’s plenty to learn from and think about.  Once again, it’s shown how complex modern communications and discussions are, and how tricky it is to separate violent and abusive content from careless comments.  Here’s a thought provoking example:

Mcrouter: a memcached protocol router

Mcrouter is an Open Source tool developed by Facebook for scaling up the memcached deployments:

Mcrouter is a memcached protocol router for scaling memcached (http://memcached.org/) deployments. It’s a core component of cache infrastructure at Facebook and Instagram where mcrouter handles almost 5 billion requests per second at peak.

Here is a good overview of some of the scenarios where Mcrouter is useful.  There’s more than one.  Here are some of the features to get you started:

  • Memcached ASCII protocol
  • Connection pooling
  • Multiple hashing schemes
  • Prefix routing
  • Replicated pools
  • Production traffic shadowing
  • Online reconfiguration
  • Flexible routing
  • Destination health monitoring/automatic failover
  • Cold cache warm up
  • Broadcast operations
  • Reliable delete stream
  • Multi-cluster support
  • Rich stats and debug commands
  • Quality of service
  • Large values
  • Multi-level caches
  • IPv6 support
  • SSL support

Facebook security policies – WTF?

For a while now, whenever I post a new blog post to this site, and try to propagate it to my social network accounts, I get an error from Facebook – something about security and content policies this or that:

Social Facebook

The automation broke a few month ago, but I never cared enough to do much about it.  From then on, I don’t push all the posts to Facebook automatically, but a select few, with manual posting of the links.

Today, even the manual posting broke.  I got this:

Facebook error

OK, I thought.  Weird, but this happens.  Gladly, the error message contains the link to let Facebook know about the problem.  And so I do.  Just to get to this point:

Facebook other error

Now that’s not good.  But then again what can I do? I guess it’s a good thing I still own all of my content and have my own place to publish it at.

Hopefully, this will get resolved all by itself soon.  Or people will have only kitten pictures to look at…

100 Social Media Facts and Statistics for 2015

Social-Media-Facts-Statistics

Back in 2013 I linked to some (not so) surprising facts about social media.  Two years is a lot of time and a lot of things has changed since.  So here comes 100 social media facts and statistics for 2015.  These spread from general statistics to service-specific ones, including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest, Google+, and others.  Unlike many other similar collections, this one actually links to sources for every single fact, and provides an easy one-click share to Twitter button.  Here are a few to get you started:

  • 189 million Facebook users are ‘mobile only’.
  • There are 4 billion daily video views on Facebook.
  • 50% of unique LinkedIn visitors access it via mobile.
  • There is a 50% average increase in comments when a LinkedIn page post contains a question.
  • Over 40 billion photos have been shared on Instagram.
  • Google+ has 300 million monthly active users around the world.
  • Google+ grows at a rate of 33% each year.
  • Average time spent on YouTube per mobile session is 40 minutes.
  • There are 300 hours of video uploaded to YouTube every minute.

 

One billion people …

.. visited Facebook in a single day! I have a hard time wrapping my head around that.  I remember the Web before Facebook existed.  I remember when Facebook reached a total of billion accounts.  And now, we have a billion active daily users. Wow!

Apart from everything else, the amount of engineering that went into creating the platform, growing the features, and keeping it up and running is beyond comprehension.

0 to about 11,000 employees in 11 years.  Wow!