IPv6 20th birthday with 10% global penetration

Here’s some not so light coffee time reading on IPv6 – IPv6 non-alternatives: DJB’s article, 13 years later – an article that links, among other things to this Ars Technica article, which features some IPv6 statistics.  Summary?  Sure.  IPv6 RFC celebrates 20 year birthday this month with 10% global penetration.

ipv6

Exponential growth year-on-year is good.  But the absolute numbers aren’t so bright yet.  Especially considering some of the areas where it wasn’t so successful.

Linux and open source have won

I knew this would happen for a long time.  I knew it happened.  But even if that’s nothing new, it’s still nice to hear – “Linux and open source have won, get over it“:

In 2015, Microsoft embraced Linux, Apple open-sourced its newest, hottest programming language, and the cloud couldn’t run without Linux and open-source software. So, why can’t people accept that Linux and open source have won the software wars?

This is a huge and import change in technology, which has major affect on the rest of the world.  It’s nice to know that I’ve played a small part in that.

Netflix now available worldwide, Cyprus too

These are super exciting news – Netflix now available worldwide, Cyprus too!  For those who don’t know this service, Netflix is basically the Google of the TV series and movies.  Until recently it was only available in US, UK, and very few other locations, but now they’ve expanded to 130 countries more.

netflix pricing cy

For 8 EUR a month you get an unlimited access to all their movies and TV shows.  You can stream content to your TV, laptop, tablet, or phone, and for a couple of extra euros you can even watch stuff on more than one screen simultaneously!

Jetpack annual report for mamchenkov.net in 2015

This year’s Jetpack annual report for this blog is ready – have a look.  Here’s a teaser:

blog stats 2015

It’s been a busy year, so I haven’t been blogging as much as I wanted to, but overall, I think I did good (have a look at 2014 and 2013).  Just to give you a quick comparison:

Metric 2013 2014 2015
Visitors 58,000 81,000 96,000
Posts 560 628 541

I blog mostly for myself, but it’s nice to see a slight grow in traffic. Although the fact that the most popular post in this blog throughout the years – how to check Squid proxy version – is a little concerning, yet funny.  Well, at least people still find my “Vim for Perl developers” useful, even though it’s been more than 10 years since I wrote that (and probably five years since I promised to update it soon).

But as I said, I’m quite satisfied with my blogging this year.  Hopefully I can continue to do the same in 2016.

 

5 AWS mistakes you should avoid

5 AWS mistakes you should avoid” is a rather opinionated piece on what you should and shouldn’t do with your infrastructure, especially, when using AWS.  Here’s an example:

A typical web application consists of at least:

  • load balancer
  • scalable web backend
  • database

and looks like the following figure.

typical-web-application

This pattern is very common and if yours look different you should have (strong) reasons.

It’s all good advice in there, but it comes from a very narrow perspective.  The “mistakes” are:

  • managing infrastructure manually
  • not using Auto Scaling Groups
  • not analyzing metrics in CloudWatch
  • ignoring Trusted Advisor
  • underutilizing virtual machines

darktable 2.0 released

darktable

For those people who think Gimp is the only image editor on Linux, here’s darktable 2.0.  I mentioned it briefly before, but never linked to it.  Linux Weekly News has reviewed the release candidate recently.  Have a look at the features page – it’s quite extensive.  If you are more of a visual person, there here are a few screenshots.

Amazon Makes It Almost Impossible To Calculate Their “Virtual CPU” Equivalent

So, it looks like I’m not the only one trying to figure out Amazon EC2 virtual CPU allocation.  Slashdot runs the story (and a heated debate, as usual) on the subject of Amazon’s non-definitive virtual CPUs:

ECU’s were not the simplest approach to describing a virtual CPU, but they at least had a definition attached to them. Operations managers and those responsible for calculating server pricing could use that measure for comparison shopping. But ECUs were dropped as a visible and useful definition without announcement two years ago in favor of a descriptor — virtual CPU — that means, mainly, whatever AWS wants it to mean within a given instance family.

A precise number of ECUs in an instance has become simply a “virtual CPU.”