ftfy – fixes text for you

ftfy makes Unicode text less broken and more consistent. It works in Python 2.7, Python 3.2, or later.

The most interesting kind of brokenness that this resolves is when someone has encoded Unicode with one standard and decoded it with a different one. This often shows up as characters that turn into nonsense sequences

HTTPS availability affects website’s Google ranking

Google has been pushing for wider HTTPS adoption for a while now – converting its own services, working on the SPDY/HTTP 2.0 protocols, etc.  Now, it seems, they want other people to start adopting HTTPS too.  And what’s better way than add it as a signal to Google Search rankings?

[...] over the past few months we’ve been running tests taking into account whether sites use secure, encrypted connections as a signal in our search ranking algorithms. We’ve seen positive results, so we’re starting to use HTTPS as a ranking signal. For now it’s only a very lightweight signal—affecting fewer than 1% of global queries, and carrying less weight than other signals such as high-quality content—while we give webmasters time to switch to HTTPS. But over time, we may decide to strengthen it, because we’d like to encourage all website owners to switch from HTTP to HTTPS to keep everyone safe on the web.

Nice!  Especially for those selling SSL certificates…

Pulp – software repository management.

Pulp is a platform for managing repositories of content, such as software packages, and pushing that content out to large numbers of consumers. If you want to locally mirror all or part of a repository, host your own content in a new repository, manage content from multiple sources in one place, and push content you choose out to large numbers of clients in one simple operation, Pulp is for you!

If I believe that I already know the answer and possess the truth, then I’m not genuinely open to learning larger truths.

This is the danger of experience. We already know better, we already know that an idea or business won’t work. This is one reason that naive, young founders are often the ones who start the most successful companies — they just don’t know any better, and they’re often too arrogant to listen to those who do.

Paul Buchheit

Mark Story goes over a few reasons of why CakePHP 3.0 breaks compatibility in this blog post.   If you are working with CakePHP or involved in any large system that lives forever, you should read those in detail.  Otherwise, here is an overview:

  • PHP has changed
  • Ideas that didn’t work out so well
  • Outdated implementations
  • Improve consistency

Also, if you are working with CakePHP, you should attend the CakeFest 2014 event next week in Madrid, Spain.