On React and WordPress

I have a great deal of respect for Automattic in general and Matt Mullenweg in particular.  They have done an amazing job with WordPress, which is now used by more than a quarter of all websites.  But they are also a great example of how companies can work in the Open Source software space.

It’s not all just business.  Automattic raises the ethics bar quite high.  And today there is an excellent example of how they do it.  Check out this blog post by Matt on why WordPress will be moving away from the React JavaScript framework developed by Facebook:

I think Facebook’s clause is actually clearer than many other approaches companies could take, and Facebook has been one of the better open source contributors out there. But we have a lot of problems to tackle, and convincing the world that Facebook’s patent clause is fine isn’t ours to take on. It’s their fight.

Respect!

The Minimally-nice Open Source Software Maintainer

Brian Anderson shares a few thoughts on how to appear as a minimally-nice Open Source Software maintainer.  Maintaining Open Source Software projects is a demanding job.  And the more popular the project is, the more demanding it is.  Brian shares the following practices that minimize the effort while you still maintaining a positive atmosphere for the project’s contributors:

In summary, do these things if you want to appear to be nice, and also if you want to actually be an effective open source software maintainer:

By consistently exhibiting a few simple behaviors, one can at least look like a kind and decent person. Maybe someday we all actually will be.

Huginn integration platform

Huginn is an integration platform that manages triggered events with agent services according to workflows.  Unlike many hosted services (Zapier, IFTTT, bip.io), Huginn is an Open Source application written in Ruby on Rails, and can be hosted, extended, and customized locally.

If you can read Russian, make sure to check out this post that shows some example use case scenarios.

Boostnote – Open Source note-taking app for programmers

Boostnote is yet another alternative for taking notes.   This one is an Open Source and is built for developers.  Some of the features – Markdown support, search, cross-platform, works offline.

There is also Boostnote Team edition for, you know, teams.

Google Open Source Website

Google announced its new Open Source website:

Today, we’re launching opensource.google.com, a new website for Google Open Source that ties together all of our initiatives with information on how we use, release, and support open source.

This new site showcases the breadth and depth of our love for open source. It will contain the expected things: our programs, organizations we support, and a comprehensive list of open source projects we’ve released. But it also contains something unexpected: a look under the hood at how we “do” open source.

The site currently features over 2,000 open source projects that Google has released and contributes to.

Mautic: Open Source Marketing Automation Software

Mautic is an Open Source marketing automation software, which provides a whole bunch of functionality around contact tracking, campaign management, mass mailing, landing pages, and more.  It can be self-hosted or used as Software-as-a-Service (SaaS).  The source code is on GitHub and licensed under GPLv3.

It provides an API, and is already integrated with a whole lot of services, varying from social networks and instant messengers, to CMSes and CRMs.  Scroll down the Tour page for a comparison table against such alternatives as Marketo, InfusionSoft, Hubspot, Pardot, and Eloqua.

 

Shields.io – quality metadata badges for open source projects

Shields.io provides a large collection of badges that you can use in your project documentation (like README.md over at GitHub or BitBucket), which shows a variety of metrics for the project – latest version, number of downloads, build status, and more.  Pretty much anything that you’ve seen used by any project on GitHub is supported (I couldn’t think of a badge that wasn’t).

Now, if only there was a way to insert these things automatically somehow …

GitHub adds Open Source license descriptions

GitHub added Open Source license descriptions.  This is a tiny, but very useful feature, especially for those people who are not very well versed in the differences between GPL, MIT, BSD, and other licenses.  I wish there was a way to have something like this proprietary applications.  Maybe then people would pay attention to the end user license agreements (EULAs).

GitHub starts the Open Source Guides

GitHub blog is “Announcing Open Source Guides“:

we’re launching the Open Source Guides, a collection of resources for individuals, communities, and companies who want to learn how to run and contribute to open source.

[…]

Open Source Guides are a series of short, approachable guides to help you participate more effectively in open source, whether it’s:

  • Finding users for your project
  • Making your first contribution
  • Managing large open source communities
  • Improving the workflow of your project

These guides aim to reflect the voice of the community and their years of wisdom and practice. We’ve focused on the topics we’ve heard about most, and curated stories from open source contributors across the web.

I think it’s a great idea and I really like the execution too.  Most of what I know about Open Source comes from years of participation, and from reading old books, manuals and licenses – not something that is easy to share with people who are just getting their feet wet.

GitHub’s Open Source Guides are very simple, concise and specific.  And they cover a variety of subjects, not just the legal or technical side of things, but also communications, support, marketing, etc.

Creative Commons beta tests new search

Creative Commons is beta testing a new search implementation.  It helps with finding creative work (mostly images for now) that one can use commercially, modify, adapt, and build upon.  For now, it brings the results from a few different sources that you’d have to search separately before – 500px, FlickrMetropolitan Museum of ArtNew York Public Library, and Rijksmuseum.

I’m sure once the functionality and performance are stabilized, more resources and types of creatives will be added.  After all, Creative Commons works with quite a few platforms.

Oh, and if you’ve spent the last few years in a cave and don’t know what Creative Commons is all about, here are a couple of links for you:

Via WordPress Tavern.