GLWTPL – Good Luck With That Public License

GLWTPL is awesome!

GLWT Public License
Copyright (c) Everyone, except Author

The author has absolutely no clue what the code in this project does.
It might just work or not, there is no third option.

Everyone is permitted to copy, distribute, modify, merge, sell, publish, sublicense or whatever they want with this software but at their OWN RISK.

GOOD LUCK WITH THAT PUBLIC LICENSE
TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COPYING, DISTRIBUTION, AND MODIFICATION

0. You just DO WHATEVER YOU WANT TO as long as you NEVER LEAVE A TRACE TO TRACK THE AUTHOR of the original product to blame for or held responsible.

IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

Good luck and Godspeed.

Grav – a modern open source flat-file CMS

Grav is yet another addition to the growing number of the Open Source flat-file content management systems.  I guess, more and more people are realizing that not every website needs a database behind it.  And those that do need one, will have to work hard to keep it flexible and scaleable.

Grav brings a user friendly interface, lots of features, and extendability with themes and plugins.  Give it a spin!

Linux Journal Ceases Publication

These are some sad, sad news, folks – Linux Journal is closing down:

EOF

It looks like we’re at the end, folks. If all goes according to a plan we’d rather not have, the November issue of Linux Journal was our last.

The simple fact is that we’ve run out of money, and options along with it. We never had a wealthy corporate parent or deep pockets of our own, and that made us an anomaly among publishers, from start to finish. While we got to be good at flying close to the ground for a long time, we lost what little elevation we had in November, when the scale finally tipped irrevocably to the negative.

I’ve been a subscriber of the Linux Journal for many years (just not the most recent ones), and I’ve learned a lot from it.  It’s very sad to see it go, even though it’s been years since I read it last.

Mautic – Open Source Marketing Automation

Mautic is an Open Source marketing automation solution.  It features contact management, social media marketing, email marketing, forms, campaigns, reports, and pretty much everything else you’d expect from a tool like this.

If you are lost between a gadzillion online tools available for marketing automation, and/or don’t trust third-party providers and want to have a system of your own, give it a try.

Postcardware

I am not the biggest fan of shareware or other ways of limiting user rights when it comes to software, but if I had to pick one and call it my favorite, I’d go for the  postcardware.  Have a look at this good example:

Open source software is used in all projects we deliver. Laravel, Nginx, Ubuntu are just a few of the free pieces of software we use every single day. For this, we are very grateful.

When we feel we have solved a problem in a way that can help other developers, we release our code as open source software on GitHub.

A lot of our packages are postcardware —free to use if you send us a postcard.

 

The sudden death and eternal life of Solaris

Bryan Cantrill wrote this blog post on the death of Solaris.  Here’s a bit like the most about it, which talks about the proprietary software vs. Open Source:

Assuming that this is indeed the end of Solaris (and it certainly looks that way), it offers a time for reflection. Certainly, the demise of Solaris is at one level not surprising, but on the other hand, its very suddenness highlights the degree to which proprietary software can suffer by the vicissitudes of corporate capriciousness. Vulnerable to executive whims, shareholder demands, and a fickle public, organizations can simply change direction by fiat. And because — in the words of the late, great Roger Faulkner — “it is easier to destroy than to create,” these changes in direction can have lasting effect when they mean stopping (or even suspending!) work on a project. Indeed, any engineer in any domain with sufficient longevity will have one (or many!) stories of exciting projects being cancelled by foolhardy and myopic management. For software, though, these cancellations can be particularly gutting because (in the proprietary world, anyway) so many of the details of software are carefully hidden from the users of the product — and much of the innovation of a cancelled software project will likely die with the project, living only in the oral tradition of the engineers who knew it. Worse, in the long run — to paraphrase Keynes — proprietary software projects are all dead. However ubiquitous at their height, this lonely fate awaits all proprietary software.

There is, of course, another way — and befitting its idiosyncratic life and death, Solaris shows us this path too: software can be open source. In stark contrast to proprietary software, open source does not — cannot, even — die. Yes, it can be disused or rusty or fusty, but as long as anyone is interested in it at all, it lives and breathes. Even should the interest wane to nothing, open source software survives still: its life as machine may be suspended, but it becomes as literature, waiting to be discovered by a future generation. That is, while proprietary software can die in an instant, open source software perpetually endures by its nature — and thrives by the strength of its communities. Just as the existence of proprietary software can be surprisingly brittle, open source communities can be crazily robust: they can survive neglect, derision, dissent — even sabotage.

On React and WordPress

I have a great deal of respect for Automattic in general and Matt Mullenweg in particular.  They have done an amazing job with WordPress, which is now used by more than a quarter of all websites.  But they are also a great example of how companies can work in the Open Source software space.

It’s not all just business.  Automattic raises the ethics bar quite high.  And today there is an excellent example of how they do it.  Check out this blog post by Matt on why WordPress will be moving away from the React JavaScript framework developed by Facebook:

I think Facebook’s clause is actually clearer than many other approaches companies could take, and Facebook has been one of the better open source contributors out there. But we have a lot of problems to tackle, and convincing the world that Facebook’s patent clause is fine isn’t ours to take on. It’s their fight.

Respect!

The Minimally-nice Open Source Software Maintainer

Brian Anderson shares a few thoughts on how to appear as a minimally-nice Open Source Software maintainer.  Maintaining Open Source Software projects is a demanding job.  And the more popular the project is, the more demanding it is.  Brian shares the following practices that minimize the effort while you still maintaining a positive atmosphere for the project’s contributors:

In summary, do these things if you want to appear to be nice, and also if you want to actually be an effective open source software maintainer:

By consistently exhibiting a few simple behaviors, one can at least look like a kind and decent person. Maybe someday we all actually will be.

Huginn integration platform

Huginn is an integration platform that manages triggered events with agent services according to workflows.  Unlike many hosted services (Zapier, IFTTT, bip.io), Huginn is an Open Source application written in Ruby on Rails, and can be hosted, extended, and customized locally.

If you can read Russian, make sure to check out this post that shows some example use case scenarios.