WordPress Plugin : Typecase Web Fonts

Disclaimer: I’m not much of a fonts guy, but once in a while I just want to be.

I was reading the “Best Practices for Designing a Pragmatic RESTful API” article, when I realized I liked the font it was written in very much.  I liked it so much that I immediately wanted to have it on my blog too.  Chromium Inspector tool helped identify it as Ubuntu font family.

I have no problem editing WordPress themes’ CSS files, but I prefer to avoid it whenever possible.  So a quick Google search later I found this blog post, which describes how to customize fonts in the Twenty Fifteen theme, which is coincidentally what I’m using currently.

The blog post recommended Typecase Web Fonts plugin.  I installed it and started playing around with it, and I have to say it’s pretty amazing.  Basically, it provides a font search tool in the WordPress admin.  Once you find the font, it shows you the preview text and some font details.  You then add CSS selectors on which you want this font to apply.  It took me literally 3 minutes to figure it all out.  You can even add multiple fonts.  For example,  since now I had sans-serif font for the blog content, I wanted to use a serif font for the headings – boom! – and I have Roboto Slab font to compliment Ubuntu.

The plugin is so easy to use and is so handy that I think we’ll be using it at work now too.  Check it out.

Random fonts and colors for each WordPress blog post

Here is an interesting web design idea that adds uniqueness to the website : use a random font for post titles, and use random color schemes for each post.   To hell with consistency you say?  Well, apparently, being random is being consistent too.

Picked up the thought from this blog post.

Calypso – the new WordPress admin interface

Matt Mullenweg shares some exciting news – WordPress is getting a major overhaul of its admin interface.  Completely rewritten in JavaScript, with API support in the backend, it is fast, modern, and will push WordPress right into the future.

Check it out on WordPress.com today!  It shouldn’t be too long before JetPack brings it to all the self-hosted sites as a feature.

Here’s the comparison table for old and new.

calypso

Best WordPress Plugins – Over 40 Hand-Tested Plugins!

wp-help

Best WordPress Plugins is an excellent collection of plugins for all sorts of things – from posts and comments management to podcasting and security.  Some are free, others – commercial.  I’m sure that even if you’ve been running a WordPress site for years, you’ll still find something new for you here.

Rogue Wave Software acquires Zend Technologies

zend rogue wave

Zend Technologies, the company behind PHP, has been acquired by Rogue Wave Software.  This sounds like huge news, except that I have no idea about who Rogue Wave Software are, what they do, and what’s their plan in regards to PHP.  Sure, the announcement suggests that they’ll help to push PHP technology into the enterprise.  But, I guess, that remains to be seen.

Congratulations and kudos to Zend Technologies for all the work they’ve done so far.

Packaging third-party plugins with your WordPress theme

wordpress theme plugins

Many a time I’ve been involved in building a custom WordPress theme, which relied or benefited from some plugins being installed and activated.  I’ve always had an ad hoc solution to the problem, with my own installation scripts, WP-CLI mockery, etc. “Packaging third-party plugins with your WordPress theme using TGM Plugin Activation library” covers a much more elegant solution.  I haven’t tried it yet, but it does look very promising for my next WordPress project.

11 Highly Underrated Plugins for WordPress

I came across this list of 11 highly underrated plugins for WordPress.  I wouldn’t go as far as call of them highly underrated, as some of them are rather highly rated.  But that’s not the point.  I wanted to share the list especially for these three:

Alex King Rememberances

I’ve just discovered some sad sad news.  Alex King, one of the bigger people in the WordPress community for years, is fighting a stage 4 cancer battle.  Alex is well known for a few things, most notably for his design of the Share icon, his contributions to WordPress core, and his work as a founder of Crowd Favorite.

I’ve never met Alex or spoke to him directly, but his work is a constant inspiration.  From the early days, when I was promoting WordPress as a flexible platform for web application development, I used his work for powerful examples.  I’ve also built projects using Carrington Core framework.  This blog ran both Carrington Blog and FavePersonal themes for quite some time.  I’ve used Capsule for a while to manage my code snippets and project notes, and I’m sure I’ll use it again.  I’ve used (and still using) quite a few plugins that he was involved with – Social, Twitter Tools, Old Post Alert, Delink Comment Author, and others.  I’ve been an occasional reader of his blog.  And, of course, like anyone else using WordPress, I’ve benefited from his work.

The time has come to return a favor.  Alex is compiling some information about his work and career for his 6 year old daughter to learn more about him.  So if you met Alex, communicated with him, or benefited from his work – take a couple of minutes to share your experience.  He well deserves that.

To Alex: thank you for all your work.  It’s inspirational and educational.  Stay strong!