A Curated List of Tech Podcasts

It’s been a few month since I reviewed my podcast subscriptions.  Driving over 150 kilometers every working day gives me plenty of time to readjust my tastes and preferences.  Just doesn’t leave me too much time to actually do something about it.

Podcasts are easy to subscribe to.  Once you find the ones you like.  Finding the ones you like takes forever though.  Here’s where WP Tavern’s post “Awesome Geek Podcasts: A Curated List of Tech Podcasts” comes in handy.  Cause it provides not one, but two lists of podcasts:

  1. The best WordPress podcasts ultimate list
  2. A curated list of Awesome Geek Podcasts.

And while I’m familiar with many on that list, there’s a tonne of those that I haven’t heard, or heard about.

Any other recommendations?

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I’m running Google AdSense on this website to help me get a few cents for the hosting bill (it’s literally cents, not millions of dollars, like some of you apparently think).  Google now in compliance with EU Cookie Law requires publishers to have the cookie warning.

Please ensure that you comply with this policy as soon as possible, and not later than 30th September 2015.

If your site or app does not have a compliant consent mechanism, you should implement one now. To make this process easier for you, we have compiled some helpful resources at cookiechoices.org.

Usually, I don’t care about these things, or avoid them all together.  But since we are facing similar issues at work, I decided to run with it and see how it works and if it has any affect at all.

Gladly, I didn’t have to do any work at all.  The good folks have already implemented the Cookie Law Info plugin for WordPress, so that’s what I have now.  You have the choice to either accept the cookies, or leave the site.  I’m not going to fish out each cookie one by one and explain what it does.  Nobody cares. And if you do, you are probably here by mistake anyway.

WordPress 4.3 “Billie” is out

The brand new and shiny version 4.3 of WordPress is out, bringing more bells and whistles to Customizer, formatting shortcuts to the editor (looks like Markdown made its mark), and more.

I’ve upgraded and also switched this site to Twenty Fifteen theme, just to see how it all works.  No coding customization done yet – only whatever is available through the mouse clicks.

WordPress Plugins GitHub Mirror

WordPress Plugins GitHub Mirror (or on GitHub):

Say hello to fully automated GitHub mirrors of every plugin in the WordPress.org plugin repository. These aren’t your typical plugin Git repositories. These mirrors can be used for fast, efficient, and automated plugin updates using Composer, and don’t require “sync scripts” or separate Subversion checkouts for plugin development. They also offer a way for plugin developers to make the move to Git even while others continue working on the same plugin using Subversion uninterrupted.

stats

Impressive, and quite useful.

Extending WordPress With Custom Content Types

Smashing Magazine’s take on “Extending WordPress With Custom Content Types” is one of the best I’ve seen around.  It is very complete – skipping only, from what I can tell, the REST API functionality of the custom post types.  It’s easy to read and follow.  It has both screenshots and code snippets.  And it is based on a real example.

wordpress-custom-post-type-menu-preview-opt

This article alone can answer a gadzillion of those “Can this be done in WordPress?” questions.

WordPress 4.2 “Powell”

WordPress 4.2 is out.  This release brings a whole lot of new features, bug fixes and improvements.  One that I’m most excited about (and thus testing right now) is the updated Press This bookmarklet for faster sharing, which now also works on the mobile (I have yet to try it though).

Source: WordPress › WordPress 4.2 “Powell”

Grouped tags and categories

Just a quick update on something that I wanted to do for quite a while now – I’ve joined the display of tags and categories.  They are still separated in the back-end for me to manage the posts easier.  I just figured out that for site visitors there’s no practical difference, and thus using two user interface elements where one can do the job is not ideal.  The code snippet that helped me do that was borrowed (and slightly modified) from this Codex page.  The only two change that I did were:

  • Skip the General category (or All, as it’s labeled in this case), since all posts belong to it anyway.
  • Skip post format taxonomy (as those are already encoded with post styling – colors and titles).

I’ve also thrown a copyright into the footer and a small welcome box to the sidebar, but those are just cosmetics.