Multiple Perspectives On Technical Problems and Solutions

Multiple Perspectives On Technical Problems and Solutions” is an interesting take on engineering in general and software architecture in particular.  It starts off with:

Fundamental: engineering decision-making is a socially constructed activity

[…]

In other words, engineering (as an activity) does not have “correct” solutions to problems. As an aside, if you’re looking for correct solutions to problems, I’d suggest that you go work in a different field (like mathematics); engineering will likely frustrate you.

It then goes into dialogues and discussions, architecture review meetings, and provides a few pointers on how to get the best of those.

Angular vs. React vs. Vue: A 2017 comparison

Angular vs. React vs. Vue: A 2017 comparison” is a very lengthy and detailed comparison of the top three most popular JavaScript frameworks: Angular, React and Vue.  There are also lots of links and references for further reading, but even if you don’t leave the article, chances are you’ll have a pretty good idea of which framework suits you best.  For me, it looks like it’s Vue.

And as a side note, this quote made me smile:

The dirty little secret is that most “modern JavaScript development” is nothing to do with actually building websites — it’s building packages that can be used by people who build libraries that can be used by people who build frameworks that people who write tutorials and teach courses can teach.I’m not sure anyone is actually building anything for actual users to interact with.

Nginx Unit

 

Nginx Unit looks interesting:

What is NGINX Unit?
NGINX Unit is a new, lightweight, open source application server built to meet the demands of today’s dynamic and distributed applications. Deploy configuration changes with no service disruptions. Run code in multiple languages. Build the foundation of your service mesh.

An application server – and so much more.

Still in beta though…

Internet Protocol version 10 (IPv10)

Heard enough about IPv4 and IPv6 yet?  Good.  Here’s something new for you – IPv10.

IP version 10 (IPv10) is a new version of the Internet Protocol,
designed to allow IP version 6 [RFC-2460] to communicate to
IP version 4 (IPv4) [RFC-791] and vice versa.

Radicale – Free and Open-Source CalDAV and CardDAV Server

Radicale is a free and Open Source CalDAV and CardDAV server.  Here are some of the features:

  • Shares calendars through CalDAV, WebDAV and HTTP.
  • Shares contacts through CardDAV, WebDAV and HTTP.
  • Supports events, todos, journal entries and business cards.
  • Works out-of-the-box, no installation nor configuration required.
  • Can warn users on concurrent editing.
  • Can limit access by authentication.
  • Can secure connections.
  • Works with many CalDAV and CardDAV clients.

Here is a blog post that provides some instructions on how to set it up and synchronize contacts and calendars between multiple services and applications.

Atlassian Stride

Stride is a new product from Atlassian.  It is a re-branded and, hopefully, improved HipChat.  I haven’t tried it yet, but our team account will be upgraded soon enough.

To be honest, I’m not that excited about this move, but I’ll give it a benefit of a doubt.  I know there was a lot of hype about Slack recently, but I was really happy with HipChat.   I tried Slack for three days, and ran away.  But HipChat I can’t leave without.  It’s a much simpler and cleaner user interface, and it just works – completely out of your way.

Judging by the screenshots, Stride is a user interface upgrade to HipChat.  Atlassian has been moving to the new design recently with BitBucket and possibly other tools, so this part makes sense from at least their perspective.  Stride also brings free video calls, voice calls, and screen sharing.  HipChat had this option for the premium accounts (2$/month/user).  We tried it for a month and reverted, as the quality of calls and video was horrible.  And there were constant crashes and disconnections. Hopefully, Atlassian has put some work into these issues for the Stride release.

The most annoying thing about the upgrade from HipChat to Stride will be all the integrations.  Atlassian is promising to migrate all the data – history, files, custom smileys, etc.  But the best part about HipChat are the integrations.  We have a whole lot of them – GitHub, BitBucket, TravisCI, Twitter, WordPress,  Zabbix, and even our own custom ones, that we use for project deployments.  All these will have to be reconfigured and setup for Stride separately.  That’ll take a few hours here and there to get things back to where they were.

As far as the new features go, I don’t see too much yet.  Apart from the already mentioned voice calls, video calls, and screen sharing, there are just a couple.  Focus Mode is not really a big feature.  HipChat, much like any other messaging application, already had the status (Online, Away, Do Not Disturb, etc).  So Focus Mode is pretty much the same thing, with an extra time setting, so that you don’t forget to change you status back after a couple of hours.

Actions and Decisions is a nice addition.  You’ll be able to mark any message as an action or decision so that its easier to find and follow up on later.  But for us that’s not going to do much as we are already using Redmine for the project management.  Actions go into Redmine as tickets, and can later be referenced in commit messages, linked to each other, etc.  Having actions in Stride will probably work for very small teams with very few projects.  For us, we have a separate room for every project, every team, every office, and then some.  So searching for actions in a hundred-something rooms is far from perfect.  But maybe Stride’s search will be more powerful than that one of HipChat.  We’ll see.

Oh, and I’m guessing all the users will have to downloading and install new apps – for mobile, desktop, etc.  That’s yet another thing to do.

As I said, I haven’t tried Stride yet, and I hope it’ll be a huge improvement over HipChat, even though I HipChat worked great for me.  As I see it now, I think re-branding and the new design could have happened on the HipChat infrastructure.  Moving people to the new application altogether has to be justified by some major improvements.  And I’m not seeing anything major just yet.

Effective Presentations Using Applied Logical Fallacies

Effective Presentations Using Applied Logical Fallacies” is yet another reminder of logical fallacies, brain shortcuts, and psychological misbehavior that is often taken advantage of by speakers, presenters, and other people trying to convince an audience of something.

TreeSheets – Open Source Free Form Data Organizer

TreeSheets is an Open Source cross-platform free form data organizer, which can replace a variety of other tools, like spreadsheets, mind mappers, outliners, project management tools, text editors, notes applications, and even small databases.  It works on Linux, Windows, and Mac, and looks very interesting.  Have a look at the screenshots for some of the things that it can do.