A guide for how to talk to a developer

A guide for how to talk to a developer“:

We built this resource to help you better communicate with any developers and other technical people that you work with. These flashcards teach and review basic technology vocabulary and computer science terms. We hope it’s helpful to you as you hire, manage, and collaborate with software engineers, your CTO, or other members of your technical team.

The guide is a collection of flip cards, broken down into three categories:

  • Computer Science (29 cards)
  • Languages and Frameworks (25 cards)
  • Developer Tools (12 cards)

Super cool!

11 Best Programming Fonts

It’s that time of the year once again, when you should take a five minute break from whatever it is you are doing.  Here are “11 Best Programming Fonts” that might help you out in being a little bit more productive.  If not that, than at least bring you a slight change and some eye candy, when staring at your code.

For me personally, Source Code Pro by Adobe (featured in the screenshot above) is still the best option.  I have it setup in the Terminator as Source Code Pro Semibold at size 11, which makes it large enough to work with the code comfortably and small enough to eat too much screen space.

If you want to find and compare more fonts, have a look at these two resources:

 

Understanding disk usage in Linux

Understanding disk usage in Linux” is a well written in-depth look into the Linux filesystem layer and how things work under the hood.  This is probably not something most people would have to deal on a day-to-day basis, but it is very useful for anyone doing system administration and looking for the better understanding of operating systems.

commandlinefu – a place to share and gather command line wisdom

commandlinefu is a place to learn and share your knowledge about command line tools and techniques.  It has thousands of tips, tricks, and handy shortcuts, covering a wide range of tools from shells and editors to version control and remote access.

pvm – PHP Process virtual machine for building and executing workflows

At some point last year I wrote the blog post titled “Getting started with workflows in PHP“.  I received quite a bit of feedback about it, but, unfortunately, the priorities at work shifted and I haven’t done much more with workflows since than.

The world, however, hasn’t stopped.  The tools and libraries that existed a year ago are still around and they got a lot better.  Additionally, there are a few new tools that help with workflows, state machines, and the like.

Today I came across a really useful and easy to use tool for building and executing workflows in PHP – pvm, aka PHP Process Virtual Machine.  It’s built and released as Open Source software under MIT license by the excellent guys at Forma-Pro.   If you are still looking for a tool to build and execute workflows, I strongly suggest you give PVM a try.  Given how complex the nature of the problem, this tool is probably the easiest to get started with.