Fedora 26 Update

Fedora 26 has been release about a month and a half ago.  But I didn’t have the time to update my laptop until today.  There was also nothing particularly exciting for me in this release, so there was no rush.

Here’s what I had to do today to update my laptop from Fedora 25 to Fedora 26:

# Let's get into root to save a few keystrokes
sudo su -
# Install all updates for Fedora 25
dnf update
# Install dnf system upgrade plugin
dnf install dnf-plugin-system-upgrade
# Download upgrade packages for Fedora 26
dnf system-upgrade download --refresh --releasever=26
# Reboot and install Fedora 26
dnf system-upgrade reboot

If you need more help, have a look at DNF system upgrade wiki page.

The whole process took less an hour, but your mileage may vary.  For me, the download itself was the slowest part.  I had to pull down about 2.5 GBytes worth of packages, and given my office connection, it took about 35-40 minutes.

The installation itself took about 10-15 minutes, for which, I think, the solid-state disk (SSD) helped a lot.

One more reboot later, everything was up and running.  Of all the changes pushed into this version, I think, the upgrade to PHP 7.1 is the one that affects me the most.

Fire and Motion

Joel Spolsky wrote “Fire and Motion” blog post back in 2002, but it is as relevant today as it was 15 years ago. It’s a good read on the subject of both personal and organizational productivity.

What drives me crazy is that ever since my first job I’ve realized that as a developer, I usually average about two or three hours a day of productive coding. When I had a summer internship at Microsoft, a fellow intern told me he was actually only going into work from 12 to 5 every day. Five hours, minus lunch, and his team loved him because he still managed to get a lot more done than average. I’ve found the same thing to be true. I feel a little bit guilty when I see how hard everybody else seems to be working, and I get about two or three quality hours in a day, and still I’ve always been one of the most productive members of the team. That’s probably why when Peopleware and XP insist on eliminating overtime and working strictly 40 hour weeks, they do so secure in the knowledge that this won’t reduce a team’s output.

WPBloggerTricks – The Real Blogger & WordPress Tricks

It looks like blogging is coming back.  At least in the world around me, there is quite a few new blogs spawning up, and the old ones being resurrected.  I don’t know what’s causing that, but I see it as a good thing.

I’ve been answering a lot more basic blogging questions from all sorts of people recently, so I thought, let me link to one of those tips and tricks sites that have plenty to offer.  You know, just to save myself a bit of time.

WPBloggerTricks seems like a good choice here.  It has plenty to offer to the new and return bloggers.

Is VPN Legal in Your Country?

TheBestVPN.com published a study of whether or not VPNs are legal in 196 countries around the world.  There is a summary for each, and some links to details of the research.

VPNs are legal, generally.

It depends largely on the country you’re physically sitting in while using a VPN. But even then, their laws and restrictions are often opaque.  What’s legal vs. illegal is not always clear.  Some activities, while frowned upon, are still shrouded in grey area.  In this research we fact-checked 196 countries laws and their opinions on VPNs.

VPNs are illegal in: China, Turkey, Iraq, United Arab Emirates, Belarus, Oman.

VPNs are some-what illegal in: Iran, North-Korea, Turkmenistan.

P.S.: If you can’t access the links above, VPN is probably illegal (or at least blocked) in your country or region.

Things I wish someone had told me before I started angel investing

Things I wish someone had told me before I started angel investing blog post shares some insight into what it takes to be an angel investor, and how much failure one will probably go through before getting any kind of success.  Like with everything, it takes time, money, and effort to learn the intricacies.

Actually, the needle-in-the-haystack is not quite the right metaphor.  There is a small cadre of people who actually have what it takes to successfully build an NBT, and experienced investors are pretty good at recognizing them.  Because of this, they don’t have trouble raising money.  As I mentioned earlier, one of the reasons people get into angel investing is because they think it’s more fun to be the beggee than the beggor.  But the cool kids don’t beg.  The cool kids — the ones who really know what they’re doing and have the best chances of succeeding — decide who they allow to invest in their companies.  And they want investors who have been around the block, who know what they are doing, who have a thick rolodex of potentially useful contacts, and most importantly, deep enough pockets to do follow-on investments, and thick enough hides not to complain if things go south.

If you want to make money angel investing, you really have to treat it as a full time job, not because it makes you more likely to pick the winners, but because it makes it more likely that the winners will pick you.

If you’re not ready for that, you will be much better off financially buying index funds.

The Minimally-nice Open Source Software Maintainer

Brian Anderson shares a few thoughts on how to appear as a minimally-nice Open Source Software maintainer.  Maintaining Open Source Software projects is a demanding job.  And the more popular the project is, the more demanding it is.  Brian shares the following practices that minimize the effort while you still maintaining a positive atmosphere for the project’s contributors:

In summary, do these things if you want to appear to be nice, and also if you want to actually be an effective open source software maintainer:

By consistently exhibiting a few simple behaviors, one can at least look like a kind and decent person. Maybe someday we all actually will be.