Page builders and multilingual WordPress websites

WPML.org, the web home of the WordPress Multilingual Plugin runs this blog post about the upcoming support for WordPress page builders.  Apart from the good news themselves, there are some insightful results of the survey that the team did, trying to understand who uses page builders and how.  I found the stats on which page builder solutions people use the most interesting:

q2-which-page-builder

At work we are primarily using Divi (when we are not building our own themes), but we’ve also done a few sites with Enfold.  I’ve also seen Avada in the wild.  But I can’t tell you which ones are better, because when it comes to using page builders, I’m mostly not involved.  These tools are so awesome these days that they can be easily used by a non-technical person.  Which is exactly what we do ;)

WordPress Plugins : Demo Data Creator

Here is a useful plugin for all of you, WordPress developers – Demo Data Creator.   It generates a whole lot of test / demo data and populates your WordPress site with it.  No more lengthy copy-pastes of Lorem Ipsum into posts and pages, single user (hi admin) installations, and senseless “foobar” and “foobar2” categories.  Now you can populate your test or development environment with lots of data to help with previews, and all those issues around search, pagination, and things like that.

demo-data-creator

If you’d rather avoid the plugin and automate this kind of work yourself, make sure to have a look at WP-CLI – command line interface for WordPress, which, among others, has the “wp post generate” command.

WordPress Plugin : Ultimate Social Media

If you are one of those dinosaurs, who still prefer to post content to your own web space and then share it on social media (much like yours truly), then here’s the Ultimate Social Media WordPress plugin (you are using WordPress, right?) that helps will those buttons, sharing, animation, and more.  You can even choose how your site’s buttons will look like from 16 different designs.

social buttons

WordPress Plugin : Typecase Web Fonts

Disclaimer: I’m not much of a fonts guy, but once in a while I just want to be.

I was reading the “Best Practices for Designing a Pragmatic RESTful API” article, when I realized I liked the font it was written in very much.  I liked it so much that I immediately wanted to have it on my blog too.  Chromium Inspector tool helped identify it as Ubuntu font family.

I have no problem editing WordPress themes’ CSS files, but I prefer to avoid it whenever possible.  So a quick Google search later I found this blog post, which describes how to customize fonts in the Twenty Fifteen theme, which is coincidentally what I’m using currently.

The blog post recommended Typecase Web Fonts plugin.  I installed it and started playing around with it, and I have to say it’s pretty amazing.  Basically, it provides a font search tool in the WordPress admin.  Once you find the font, it shows you the preview text and some font details.  You then add CSS selectors on which you want this font to apply.  It took me literally 3 minutes to figure it all out.  You can even add multiple fonts.  For example,  since now I had sans-serif font for the blog content, I wanted to use a serif font for the headings – boom! – and I have Roboto Slab font to compliment Ubuntu.

The plugin is so easy to use and is so handy that I think we’ll be using it at work now too.  Check it out.

Best WordPress Plugins – Over 40 Hand-Tested Plugins!

wp-help

Best WordPress Plugins is an excellent collection of plugins for all sorts of things – from posts and comments management to podcasting and security.  Some are free, others – commercial.  I’m sure that even if you’ve been running a WordPress site for years, you’ll still find something new for you here.

Packaging third-party plugins with your WordPress theme

wordpress theme plugins

Many a time I’ve been involved in building a custom WordPress theme, which relied or benefited from some plugins being installed and activated.  I’ve always had an ad hoc solution to the problem, with my own installation scripts, WP-CLI mockery, etc. “Packaging third-party plugins with your WordPress theme using TGM Plugin Activation library” covers a much more elegant solution.  I haven’t tried it yet, but it does look very promising for my next WordPress project.

11 Highly Underrated Plugins for WordPress

I came across this list of 11 highly underrated plugins for WordPress.  I wouldn’t go as far as call of them highly underrated, as some of them are rather highly rated.  But that’s not the point.  I wanted to share the list especially for these three:

Alex King Rememberances

I’ve just discovered some sad sad news.  Alex King, one of the bigger people in the WordPress community for years, is fighting a stage 4 cancer battle.  Alex is well known for a few things, most notably for his design of the Share icon, his contributions to WordPress core, and his work as a founder of Crowd Favorite.

I’ve never met Alex or spoke to him directly, but his work is a constant inspiration.  From the early days, when I was promoting WordPress as a flexible platform for web application development, I used his work for powerful examples.  I’ve also built projects using Carrington Core framework.  This blog ran both Carrington Blog and FavePersonal themes for quite some time.  I’ve used Capsule for a while to manage my code snippets and project notes, and I’m sure I’ll use it again.  I’ve used (and still using) quite a few plugins that he was involved with – Social, Twitter Tools, Old Post Alert, Delink Comment Author, and others.  I’ve been an occasional reader of his blog.  And, of course, like anyone else using WordPress, I’ve benefited from his work.

The time has come to return a favor.  Alex is compiling some information about his work and career for his 6 year old daughter to learn more about him.  So if you met Alex, communicated with him, or benefited from his work – take a couple of minutes to share your experience.  He well deserves that.

To Alex: thank you for all your work.  It’s inspirational and educational.  Stay strong!

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I’m running Google AdSense on this website to help me get a few cents for the hosting bill (it’s literally cents, not millions of dollars, like some of you apparently think).  Google now in compliance with EU Cookie Law requires publishers to have the cookie warning.

Please ensure that you comply with this policy as soon as possible, and not later than 30th September 2015.

If your site or app does not have a compliant consent mechanism, you should implement one now. To make this process easier for you, we have compiled some helpful resources at cookiechoices.org.

Usually, I don’t care about these things, or avoid them all together.  But since we are facing similar issues at work, I decided to run with it and see how it works and if it has any affect at all.

Gladly, I didn’t have to do any work at all.  The good folks have already implemented the Cookie Law Info plugin for WordPress, so that’s what I have now.  You have the choice to either accept the cookies, or leave the site.  I’m not going to fish out each cookie one by one and explain what it does.  Nobody cares. And if you do, you are probably here by mistake anyway.

Replacing Instagram plugin

WP Instagram Digest out. DsgnWrks Instagram Importer in. The old plugin was working more or less fine, but it lacked a bit in customization and in support of the somewhat newer WordPress features.  After stumbling upon this blog post, I decided it was time to try something new.

Some of the reasons for the replacement:

  • Import each individual Instagram photo separately, rather than a gallery.  Galleries are complicated, and often doesn’t look too good, especially with narrow WordPress themes, like the one I’m using now.
  • Customize title and content of the post.  The new plugin supports Instagram filters (which I won’t use) and locations (which I will).
  • Hashtag handling – the new plugin can strip off hashtags from post titles and content, and, instead use them as tags and or categories.
  • Support for post types – having them now as Image post type makes more sense (I’ve also converted all the previous posts too).