Vim 8.0 Released!

The team behind the greatest text editor of all times has release the new major version – Vim 8.0.  It’s the first major release in 10 years!  Brief overview of the changes:

  • Asynchronous I/O support, channels, JSON
  • Jobs
  • Timers
  • Partials, Lambdas and Closures
  • Packages
  • New style testing
  • Viminfo merged by timestamp
  • GTK+ 3 support
  • MS-Windows DirectX support

For a more complete list and details, have a look here.

The TL;DR summary: Vim provides a lot more power now to plugin developers, so we’ll be seeing a boost in both new functionality and old ways getting better.

Here is a mandatory Slashdot discussion with your usual Vim vs. Emacs flame.

P.S.: Emacs has recently released a major update too …

Micro – a modern and intuitive terminal-based text editor


Micro is a modern console based text editor, written in Go.  Version 1.0.0 has been recently released.  It’s cross-platform (installs as a single binary) and supports a variety of features:

  • Easy to use and to install
  • No dependencies or external files are needed — just the binary you can download further down the page
  • Common keybindings (ctrl-s, ctrl-c, ctrl-v, ctrl-z…)
    • Keybindings can be rebound to your liking
  • Sane defaults
    • You shouldn’t have to configure much out of the box (and it is extremely easy to configure)
  • Splits and tabs
  • Extremely good mouse support
    • This means mouse dragging to create a selection, double click to select by word, and triple click to select by line
  • Cross platform (It should work on all the platforms Go runs on)
    • Note that while Windows is supported, there are still some bugs that need to be worked out
  • Plugin system (plugins are written in Lua)
  • Persistent undo
  • Automatic linting and error notifications
  • Syntax highlighting (for over 75 languages!)
  • Colorscheme support
    • By default, micro comes with 16, 256, and true color themes.
  • True color support (set the MICRO_TRUECOLOR env variable to 1 to enable it)
  • Copy and paste with the system clipboard
  • Small and simple
  • Easily configurable
  • Common editor things such as undo/redo, line numbers, unicode support…

Although not yet implemented, I hope to add more features such as autocompletion, and multiple cursors in the future.

If you are looking for a new editor, give Micro a try.

Screenshots from developers : 2002 vs. 2015

Here is a nice collection of screenshots (with some comments) from some really hardcore developers – people who are behind things like operating systems and programming languages, not the latest hipster startup that nobody will remember n three years.  Better even, the screenshots were taken in 2002 and now, 13 years later, reiterated.

desktop_bwk_2015 Two things I found interesting here:

  1. Pretty much everyone calls their setup “boring”, yet it’s obviously slow functional that very little changes over time.
  2. Some of these screenshots feature setups so basic, that for those people who are not too familiar with the applications used, it would be difficult to choose which screenshot is from 2002 and which one is from 2015.

And while I’m nowhere near that level of developer, I still have to say that my desktop hasn’t changed much in the last 13 years either.  I am spending my days in the MATE Desktop Environment, which is a fork of Gnome to maintain the awesome Gnome 2 interface and not all that craziness of Gnome 3.  And like many other people featured here, I mostly use the browser and a gadzillion of terminal windows for my work.  I also have Vim keybindings burnt into my fingers, and I can’t imagine switching to something else ever.  Here’s how it looks today.


I’m sure there must be a screenshot of my desktop from back in the days somewhere on this blog, but I don’t think I’ll find it.

Vim.js – JavaScript port of Vim

Atwood’s Law – any application that can be written in JavaScript, will eventually be written in JavaScript – seems to be getting more and more traction.  Here is the newest example – Vim.js – a JavaScript port of the popular editor Vim.


This is not a production day-to-day ready software yet, but it’s a good start.  You can check out the project from GitHub and play with the source code.