Evernote Hello vs. Facebook Hello

 

facebook hello

Facebook is launching a new app – Hello:

Billions of calls are made everyday on mobile phones and people often have very little information about who’s calling them. Today we are starting to test Hello, a new app built by the Messenger team. Hello connects with Facebook so you can see who’s calling, block unwanted calls and search for people and places.

I seem to remember another app with the same name and somewhat related functionality – Hello from Evernote.  Apparently, this one was discontinued earlier this year.  Surprising, given that some people called it the best business card scanner app.

evernote hello

The functionality of the two apps is not exactly the same but similar enough.  Given how little time passed between the “death” of one and “birth” of another, I wonder if this is a coincidence or part of a greater plan.

An Analysis of Foursquare’s Popularity After Removing Check-Ins

Junkyard Sam runs a quick “Analysis of Foursquare’s Popularity After Removing Check-Ins“.  Very well pointed out.  The split of Foursquare with Swarm was a mistake.  As a constant user of the app I felt bad about it.  I still use Swarm occasionally.  And I can’t remember the last time I loaded Foursquare.  I wish they’d merge them back together.  That was fun.

foursquare

A year without Google Reader

Mashable reminds us that it’s been a year since Google Reader has been decommissioned.  They are also doing a survey to find out if people use more of RSS feeds now or less, what they’ve substituted it with and which tools people are using now to follow their favorite feeds.

I’ve completed the survey, but without any visible results just yet, I thought I’d talk about my situation here.  In the last year my use of RSS has decreased significantly.   Even though the actual number of the feeds I am subscribed to has increased, I read them less.  I share less.  I bookmark and blog about less.  And it’ nothing but the tool’s fault.  Even though Feedly is an excellent tool – fast, flexible, with mobile support, and aesthetically pleasing, it simply is not Google Reader, which I was practically embed into.  I’ve looked around for Google Reader alternatives, I tried a few.  Feedly is the best of the bunch for my taste, but it’s different.

So, with that in mind, what happened to all that free time that I used to spend in Google Reader?  Sadly, I have to admit that I’m much more on Facebook now.  Quality-wise, that’s a huge drop.  Instead of following my favorite writers, keeping in touch with all kinds of technology advances, and learning new things, I am now participating in flaming comment wars about nothing, and watching videos of cute kittens and bouncing boobs.  Cheap entertainment swallowed me and spat me out.  It’s exactly like never switching a television set was in the last century.  And it’s a pity.

And the saddest part is that I knew it would happen.  And if I knew, Google definitely knew that too.  And they killed Google Reader anyway.  And it’ll be a long time until I let it go…

Cayley – an open-source graph inspired by the graph database behind Freebase and Google’s Knowledge Graph. Its goal is to be a part of the developer’s toolbox where Linked Data and graph-shaped data (semantic webs, social networks, etc) in general are concerned.

cayley

Facebook is dead

facebook is dead

Now that’s something you don’t see every day: the whole of Facebook is down – the website, the APIs, the social buttons, etc.

Oh, and I think they need to update the copyright year on this page.

Jokes from the office folks:

How many “f*cks” per second do you think one could hear in the Facebook office right now?

The productivity of the whole world just spiked!

Fun stuff from Twitter:

Twitter Is Not Dying

Twitter is not a social network. Not primarily, anyway. It’s better described as a social media platform, with the emphasis on “media platform.” And media platforms should not be judged by the same metrics as social networks.

Social networks connect people with one another. Those connections tend to be reciprocal. Facebook even checks in on you now and then to make sure you’ve actually met the folks who are sending you friend requests. As a social network, its chief function is to help friends, family, and acquaintances keep in touch.

Media platforms, by contrast, connect publishers with their public. Those connections tend not to be reciprocal.