Coldest, oldest, fastest : 10 extreme sea creatures

Coldest, oldest, fastest : 10 extreme sea creatures – these are amazing, both in looks and facts.  Here are my favorite two.

Angler Fish Photo: Edith Widder
Angler Fish
Photo: Edith Widder

Anglerfish inhabit the deep sea, and for a century they baffled marine biologists. At first only female anglerfish were known; where the males were and what they looked like was a complete mystery. Then a parasitologist began studying the worm-like parasites generally attached to anglerfish females. What he found, instead of parasites, were anglerfish males — each undergoing a radical transformation. When a male anglerfish is tiny, he finds and attaches to a female. First his jaws dissolve and his bloodstream fuses with the female’s. Then his brain disappears and his guts shrink. Eventually he is little more than a testis, fertilizing the eggs of one female, for the rest of his life.

Anemone purple anemonefish CC BY-SA 3.0 Photo: Nick Hobgood Purple anemone (Heteractis magnifica) and resident anemonefish (Amphiprion ocellaris) (clownfish) in East Timor.
Anemone purple anemonefish
CC BY-SA 3.0
Photo: Nick Hobgood
Purple anemone (Heteractis magnifica) and resident anemonefish (Amphiprion ocellaris) (clownfish) in East Timor.

Clownfish families were made famous in ‘Finding Nemo,’ but real ones have more peculiar lives than the movie lets on. In a sea anemone where the clownfish live, the biggest fish is always a female, laying all the eggs. The next biggest fish is a functional male, fertilizing them. And lots of smaller clownfish are immature males. When the female dies or is eaten by a predator, the biggest male switches sex to become female. At the same time the biggest immature male grows into a functional male that can fertilize the eggs. This conveyor belt system of parenting assures a constant supply of baby Nemos.

Mirabaud Yacht Racing Image

From the about page:

The ‘Mirabaud Yacht Racing Image’ is a yearly photographic contest and exhibition. It seeks to recognise the very best yacht racing image taken during the year, and that which best represents the essence and excitement of yacht racing as a sport.

Regardless of whether or not you are into sailing, photography, or sports – you will be amazed by some of the images in that contest.  It’s not one of those Flickr photo groups where you’d just scroll through.  This one will pause you, will make you look closely, and enjoy.


Creatures of nature

A lot of people, me included, are afraid of the deep sea waters.  There’s just something worrisome about all that water, that even a power such as sun can’t fully penetrate.  Water, darkness, silence – not the most comforting mix.  And then, there are creatures.  Creatures of nature.

When some of these things are in the water, I don’t want to be anywhere near there.  Even though they are probably small and don’t attack people ever.  I don’t care.

Via Big Picture.

Drowning doesn’t look like drowning

While being common knowledge between people who work on water (life guards, maritime professionals, etc), this still might be quite a shock for all the rest – drowning doesn’t look like drowning.  Most drownings you saw in movies and on TV are nothing like what a real thing is.  Here is a quote from the article that you should definitely read:

The Instinctive Drowning Response – so named by Francesco A. Pia, Ph.D.,  is what people do to avoid actual or perceived suffocation in the water.  And it does not look like most people expect.  There is very little splashing, no waving, and no yelling or calls for help of any kind.  To get an idea of just how quiet and undramatic from the surface drowning can be, consider this:  It is the number two cause of accidental death in children, age 15 and under (just behind vehicle accidents) – of the approximately 750 children who will drown next year, about 375 of them will do so within 25 yards of a parent or other adult.  In ten percent of those drownings, the adult will actually watch them do it, having no idea it is happening.