How To Keep Your Best Programmers

I really liked this article – How To Keep Your Best Programmers.  It’s not your average three paragraphs and a link, I admit. It’s somewhat of a long read.  But it does a good job of explaining why people in general, and good developers in particular choose to leave or stay in the company.

It’s difficult to quote as it flows continuously, but if I had to choose, I’d use this as a teaser:

For some background, check out this video from RSA Animate. The video is great watching, but if you haven’t the time, the gist of it is that humans are not motivated economically toward self-actualization (as widely believed) but are instead driven by these three motivating factors: the desire to control one’s own work, the desire to get better at things, and the desire to work toward some goal beyond showing up for 40 hours per week and collecting a paycheck.

Frustration with organizational stupidity is usually the result of a lack of autonomy and the perception of no discernible purpose.

Not that I am a good programmer, but it helped me understand some of my own career jumps…

Dear Al, you are fired!

Being fired is usually not much fun.  But as far as firings go, this one is pretty funny – as reported on Slashdot:

On Friday, more than 1,300 employees of London-based Aviva Investors walked into their offices, strolled over to their desks, booted up their computers and checked their emails, only to learn the shocking news: They would be leaving the company. The email ordered them to hand over company property and security passes before leaving the building, and left the staff with one final line: ‘I would like to take this opportunity to thank you and wish you all the best for the future. ‘This email was sent to Aviva’s worldwide staff of 1,300 people, with bases in the U.S., UK, France, Spain, Sweden, Canada, Italy, Ireland, Germany, Norway, Poland, Switzerland, Belgium, Austria, Finland and the Netherlands. And it was all one giant mistake: The email was intended for only one individual.

Obviously, in the corporate address book, “All Stuff” and “Al Not-the-Pacino” were right next to each other…