Using Graphviz dot for ERDs, network diagrams and more

I’ve mentioned Graphviz many a time on this blog.  It’s simple to use, yet very powerful.  The dot language is something that can be jotted down by hand in the simplest of all text editors, or generated programmatically.

The official website features a gallery, which demonstrates a wide range of graphs.  But I still wanted to blog a few examples from my recent use.

Continue reading “Using Graphviz dot for ERDs, network diagrams and more”

Chartbuilder / Gneisschart – a D3.js based front-end charting application that facilitates easy creation of simple beautiful charts

Chartbuilder / Gneisschart – a D3.js based front-end charting application that facilitates easy creation of simple beautiful charts. You can download and install it in your environment, or you can use a hosted version.

Chartbuilder

Chartbuilder was created to speed workflow in a newsroom and give reporters more responsibility over their content. It allows someone to create simple graphics quickly within a pre-specified style guide without needing specialized design software.

The output formats are can be used anywhere images and svgs are accepted. There’s no need for CMS integration or complex back end systems.

There are fewer excuses to use screenshots from analyst reports or charts in Excel.

GitHub contributions graph

After reading Mark Story‘s “Coding every day” post, I started checking my own GitHub contributions chart once in a while.  Until today, I haven’t noticed that the chart has two different modes.  One is your public contributions, seen by people who are not part of your organization’s and private projects.  Here is how mine looks. (Notice the “Public contributions” title of the graph).

github public contributions

Yeah, I know, pathetic.  And here is how the full contributions chart looks like, for me and people who have access to see my private projects activities.  The graph is for the same period. (Notice a simpler “Contributions” title of the graph”).

github contributions

 

Could be better, but not as bad anymore.  Now with that I’ll try to push more stuff to the Open Source side of things again.

Cayley – an open-source graph

Cayley – an open-source graph inspired by the graph database behind Freebase and Google’s Knowledge Graph. Its goal is to be a part of the developer’s toolbox where Linked Data and graph-shaped data (semantic webs, social networks, etc) in general are concerned.

cayley

Raphaël – JavaScript library for working with vector images

Raphaël – JavaScript library for working with vector images.

Raphaël is a small JavaScript library that should simplify your work with vector graphics on the web. If you want to create your own specific chart or image crop and rotate widget, for example, you can achieve it simply and easily with this library.

Raphaël [‘ræfeɪəl] uses the SVG W3C Recommendation and VML as a base for creating graphics. This means every graphical object you create is also a DOM object, so you can attach JavaScript event handlers or modify them later. Raphaël’s goal is to provide an adapter that will make drawing vector art compatible cross-browser and easy.

Raphaël currently supports Firefox 3.0+, Safari 3.0+, Chrome 5.0+, Opera 9.5+ and Internet Explorer 6.0+.

vis.js – a visual interaction system

vis.js – a visual interaction system

Vis.js is a dynamic, browser based visualization library. The library is designed to be easy to use, to handle large amounts of dynamic data, and to enable manipulation of and interaction with the data. The library consists of the components DataSet, Timeline, and Graph.

The vis.js library is developed by Almende B.V, as part of CHAP. Vis.js runs fine on Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Safari, IE9+, and most mobile browsers (with full touch support).