BitBucket Pipelines improved support for Docker

Here are some exciting news from the BitBucket Pipelines blog: Bitbucket Pipelines now supports building Docker images, and service containers for database testing.

We developed Pipelines to enable teams to test and deploy software faster, using Docker containers to manage their build environment. Now we’re adding advanced Docker support – building Docker images, and Service containers for database testing.

Docker Image Vulnerability Research

Federacy has an interesting research in Docker image vulnerabilities.  The bottom line is:

24% of latest Docker images have significant vulnerabilities

This can and should be improved, especially given the whole hierarchical structure of Docker images.  It’s not like improving security of all those random GitHub repositories.

10 things to avoid in Docker containers

10 things to avoid in Docker containers provides a handy reminder of what NOT to do when building Docker containers.  Read the full article for details and explanations.  For a brief summary, here are the 10 things:

  1. Don’t store data in containers
  2. Don’t ship your application in two pieces
  3. Don’t create large images
  4. Don’t use a single layer image
  5. Don’t create images from running containers
  6. Don’t use only the “latest” tag
  7. Don’t run more than one process in a single container
  8. Don’t store credentials in the image. Use environment variables
  9. Don’t run processes as a root user
  10. Don’t rely on IP addresses

SQL Server in a Fedora Docker Container

MS SQL Server and Docker

It’s a well known fact that I am not the greatest fan of Microsoft and their technologies.  I’ve been bitten many a time through the years.  And not even them becoming a Platinum Partner in the Linux Foundation can change my attitude towards them.  It’s just been too much pain, and scars, and tears, and sweat.

But the way life is, once in a while, I just have to work with or around them.  Recently, for example, at work, we’ve done a project that just had to use MS SQL Server and there was no way to get around it.  Gladly, I managed to find just the right image on the Amazon AWS Marketplace, and spin a new EC2 instance for testing.  The local development was difficult, but at least we had a place to test stuff before sending it off to the customer.

If such a need arises in the future, I think I’ll give the MS SQL for Linux a try.  And that’s when this article from Fedora Magazine might come in handy.  MS SQL + Docker + Fedora.  Hmm.

Easier AWS CLI with Docker

Here is a handy blog post that shows how to simplify the installation and running of the Amazon AWS command line commands, using Docker.  With the Dockerfile like this:

FROM python:2.7
ENV AWS_DEFAULT_REGION='[your region]'
ENV AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID='[your access key id]'
ENV AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY='[your secret]'
RUN pip install awscli
CMD /bin/bash

One can build the image and run the container as follows:

$ docker build -t gnschenker/awscli
$ docker push gnschenker/awscli:latest
$ docker run -it --rm -e AWS_DEFAULT_REGION='[your region]' -e AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID='[your access ID]' -e AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY='[your access key]' gnschenker/awscli:latest

Obviously, DO NOT hardcode your Amazon AWS credentials into an image, which will be publicly available through DockerHub.

Once the AWS CLI works for you, you can add the command to your bash aliases, to make things even easier.

BitBucket Pipelines and Docker for PHP Developers

I’ve been meaning to look into Docker for a long while now.  But, as always, time is the issue.  In the last couple of days though I’ve been integrating BitBucket Pipelines into our workflow.  BitBucket Pipelines is a continuous integration solution, which runs your project tests in a Docker container.  So, naturally, I had to get a better idea of how the whole thing works.

Docker for PHP Developers” article was super useful.  Even though it wasn’t immediately applicable to BitBucket Pipelines, as they don’t currently support multiple containers – everything has to run within a single container.

The default BitBucket Pipelines configuration suggests the phpunit/phpunit image.  If you want to run PHPUnit tests only, that works fine.  But if you want to have a full blown Nginx and MySQL setup for extra bits (UI tests, integration tests, etc), then you might find smartapps/bitbucket-pipelines-php-mysql image much more useful.  Here’s the full bitbucket-pipelines.yml file that I’ve ended up with.

StackOverflow: Docker vs. Vagrant, with project authors’ comments

There is this discussion over at StackOverflow: Should I use Vagrant or Docker for creating an isolated environment? It attracted the attention of the authors of both projects (as well as many other smart people).  Read the whole thing for interesting insights into what’s there now and what’s coming.  If you’d rather have a summary, here it is:

The short answer is that if you want to manage machines, you should use Vagrant. And if you want to build and run applications environments, you should use Docker.

Packer – a tool for creating VM and container images

With the recent explosion in the virtualization and container technologies, one is often left disoriented.  Questions like “should I use virtual machines or containers?”, “which technology should I use”, and “can I migrate from one to another later?” are just some of those that will need answering.

Here is an open source tool that helps to avoid a few of those questions – Packer (by HashiCorp):

Packer is a tool for creating machine and container images for multiple platforms from a single source configuration.

Have a look at the supported platforms:

  • Amazon EC2 (AMI). Both EBS-backed and instance-store AMIs within EC2, optionally distributed to multiple regions.
  • DigitalOcean. Snapshots for DigitalOcean that can be used to start a pre-configured DigitalOcean instance of any size.
  • Docker. Snapshots for Docker that can be used to start a pre-configured Docker instance.
  • Google Compute Engine. Snapshots for Google Compute Engine that can be used to start a pre-configured Google Compute Engine instance.
  • OpenStack. Images for OpenStack that can be used to start pre-configured OpenStack servers.
  • Parallels (PVM). Exported virtual machines for Parallels, including virtual machine metadata such as RAM, CPUs, etc. These virtual machines are portable and can be started on any platform Parallels runs on.
  • QEMU. Images for KVM or Xen that can be used to start pre-configured KVM or Xen instances.
  • VirtualBox (OVF). Exported virtual machines for VirtualBox, including virtual machine metadata such as RAM, CPUs, etc. These virtual machines are portable and can be started on any platform VirtualBox runs on.
  • VMware (VMX). Exported virtual machines for VMware that can be run within any desktop products such as Fusion, Player, or Workstation, as well as server products such as vSphere.

The only question remaining now, it seems, is “why wouldn’t you use it?”. :)

Algorithm Economy and Containers

Containers (Docker, et al) have been getting all the hype recently.  I’ve played around with these a bit, but I’m not yet convinced this is the next greatest thing for projects that I am involved with currently.  However, it helps to look at these from different perspectives.  Here’s a blog post that ties containers to a new term that I haven’t heard before – algorithm economy.

The “algorithm economy” is a term established by Gartner to describe the next wave of innovation, where developers can produce, distribute, and commercialize their code. The algorithm economy is not about buying and selling complete apps, but rather functional, easy to integrate algorithms that enable developers to build smarter apps, quicker and cheaper than before.