The coolest tech CV ever

This TravisCI blog post welcomes AJ to the team.  In it, there is a bit that caught my attention (except, of course, the one about bra burning):

If you’re so inclined, you can follow her on Twitter or run curl cv.soulshake.net.

Wait a second … A what? curl for the CV?  I had to try it out.  Here’s an even better way, for reading all the slides:

p=1; while [ $p -lt 9 ]; do curl -N cv.soulshake.net/$((p++)); read; done

Oh. My. God. Lo and behold, this is the coolest tech CV I’ve ever seen. Ever. Period.  TravisCI is so lucky to have her!

P.S.: If you are interested in how this was done, here a couple of blog posts – one and two.

The Highest-Paid C.E.O.s in 2016

The New York Times has this awesome chart of highest paid Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) in 2016.  You can sort and filter the data in a variety of ways.

Most of these guys and gals make more a year than the rest of us will ever make in our lifetime.  I guess, they totally deserve it.  I’m sure all of them work really hard to get these money.

The Engineer/Manager Pendulum

The Engineer/Manager Pendulum” is a great article about a career shift from engineering to management.  Anybody who’s in engineering now and plans or even just wants to become a manager should read this.  Anybody responsible for “promoting” engineers to managers must read this too.

Web design : from zero experience to a high paying job

Richard Yang, a UX designer at Sony, shares his path from a guy with zero experience in design to a respected professional with a high paying job.  Much like with any professional, in the past, present or future, it wasn’t an overnight success, but an inhuman amount of work and dedication, with plenty of failure.

Continue reading “Web design : from zero experience to a high paying job”

Open Source Lawyer as a Career

OpenSource.com runs this article on “What to know before jumping into a career as an open source lawyer“.  Whether or not you are planning to take that path, the article has a few interesting links and quotes.

Recently, at work, we’ve been trying to get a hold of a lawyer with Open Source experience.  Just for the consultation or two.  I wasn’t very optimistic about it, as I had a feeling those are rare beasts.  My suspicion was confirmed to a degree.  But this article reaffirms it even further:

Only a few dozen new grads a year are hired to do anything even vaguely involving open source. Only a few dozen lawyers in the entire world dedicate more than a quarter of their time to open source. Only a lucky handful, like those at Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) and Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC), work primarily directly for communities and volunteer developers.

The article also links to a couple of books on the subject, which I’m pretty sure I’ll need to buy and read soon, unless we find somebody who is actually a lawyer and has done some work in Open Source space.

The first one is “The Tech Contracts Handbook: Cloud Computing Agreements, Software Licenses, and Other IT Contracts for Lawyers and Businesspeople“.

The Tech Contracts Handbook is a practical, user-friendly reference manual and training guide on cloud computing agreements, software licenses, and other IT contracts. It’s a clause-by-clause “how to” resource, covering the issues at stake and offering negotiation tips and sample contract language.

The Handbook is for both lawyers and businesspeople — including contract managers, procurement officers, in-house and outside counsel, salespeople, and anyone else responsible for getting IT deals done. Perhaps, most important, it uses clear, simple English, like a good contract.

Topics covered include:

  • Software-as-a-service (SaaS) subscriptions
  • Warranties and service level agreements (SLA’s)
  • Data security and privacy
  • Indemnities
  • Disaster recovery (DR)
  • Non-competes
  • Limitations of liability
  • Clickwraps
  • Open source software
  • Nondisclosure agreements (NDA’s) and confidentiality
  • Technology escrow
  • Copyright and other intellectual property (IP) licensing
  • Internet and e-commerce contracts
  • And much more …

The second one is “A Primer on Intellectual Property Licensing“.

A PRIMER ON INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LICENSING (Second Edition) is a compact, practical guide to one of the most dynamic and popular areas of legal practice today-intellectual property licensing. Developed by an attorney in private practice who specializes in Silicon Valley technology licensing, this guide presents the basic rules of law you need to know for a licensing practice, along with helpful examples of contractual language, practice tips, and insights on custom and practice in the industry. This textbook is appropriate for a law school or business school seminar, or for practicing attorneys who wish to expand their practice into this exciting field. Individual chapters from this text are also available for seminars and CLE presentations (in electronic format).

Engineers Salary Data

Amitj Aggarwal, former Staff Engineer at Google (2008-2012), has collected a whole bunch of data in regards to engineers salaries, in USA and worldwide.  His points seem to be overly optimistic at times, but I don’t have any links handy to contradict his research.

Here are a few points to get you started:

  • Zoho, Salesforce pay 40% more than Oracle, Cisco, GE!!!
  • Top 7% or so engineers at Netflix, Amazon, Google, Facebook are paid more than $1.4M per year. Next 10% make $700K on average.
  • Facebook has lost relevance to Slack, LinkedIn, Snapchat, Pinterest and Quora. If you are working at Facebook ask for a 50% raise else move to a startup.
  • Oracle is loosing to cloud startups. If you are working at Oracle ask for a 60% raise else move to a startup.
  • ENGINEERS DO NOT WASTE MONEY ON AN MBA. You will make 2X more on average as an engineer.
  • Tableau, Splunk, Slack, Airbnb, Quora, Twitter, Facebook, Google pay more than $320K salary to their top hires. Definitely interview at these fine places. Uber top engineer salaries are $190-340K per year.
  • Starting salaries for fresh software engineering graduates is now $130K-160K. Ask shamelessly. For the best ones its ~$180K.
  • Apple pays 60% more than Samsung.

Signs that you’re a bad programmer

Software Engineering Tips shares some tips on how to figure out if you are a bad programmer, and how to remedy that.

Signs that you’re a bad programmer

  1. Inability to reason about code
  2. Poor understanding of the language’s programming model
  3. Deficient research skills / Chronically poor knowledge of the platform’s features
  4. Inability to comprehend pointers
  5. Difficulty seeing through recursion
  6. Distrust of code

If you are not a bad programmer, check if you are mediocre one.

Signs that you are a mediocre programmer

  1. Inability to think in sets
  2. Lack of critical thinking
  3. Pinball Programming
  4. Unfamiliar with the principles of security
  5. Code is a mess

And, finally, here are some signs that you shouldn’t be a programmer.

Signs that you shouldn’t be a programmer

  1. Inability to determine the order of program execution
  2. Insufficient ability to think abstractly
  3. Collyer Brothers syndrome
  4. Dysfunctional sense of causality
  5. Indifference to outcomes

The article also suggests some alternative career paths for you.