CakeFest 2016

I’ve just purchased my ticket for CakeFest 2016! Feeling super excited … Whoop whoop! :)

I’ve attend quite a few events in the last 15-20 years, ranging from generic TEDx, through startup and entrepreneur, generic technology, web development, PHP, and software specific ones.  CakeFest 2014 back in Madrid, Spain was one of the most memorable and is definitely in top 3 of my all time favorites.  So I’m excited about the opportunity to do it all over again, this time in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

If you are involved at all with CakePHP framework, I strongly recommend you get your ticket, while it’s still at the “blind bird” price of $150 USD for the two day conference event.  If you are very new to CakePHP, you might want to consider the workshops as well, but make sure you do the main conference no matter what.

Chrome DevTools : Remote Debugging Devices

remote-debug-banner

Remote debugging on Android with Chrome DevTools sounds like the best thing since sliced bread for anybody involved in web development.  TL;DR version:

  • There’s no substitute for debugging your site on a real device. Debug browser tabs on your device from your development workspace using remote debugging.
  • You don’t have to shift attention between your device and development screens. Use screencasting to display your device’s screen along side your developer tools.

Pull request guidelines for Bitbucket Cloud

Bitbucket is often viewed as second best compared to GitHub.  And while I love GitHub dearly, I have to say that it’s not true.  It’s as good as GitHub.  Sure, it doesn’t offer all GitHub features yet (Releases, for example), but it does offer a few features of its own, which are not found in GitHub (Projects and Approvals come to mind).

With the recent advances in Atlassian Connect – an API integration layer – there’s been quite a few apps and services that extend Bitbucket beyond what GitHub users are accustomed to.  Have a look at this Pull request guidelines for Bitbucket Cloud.

overview

It looks simple.  But it’s super handy and provides functionality, which is not as trivial as you might think.

Screenshots from developers : 2002 vs. 2015

Here is a nice collection of screenshots (with some comments) from some really hardcore developers – people who are behind things like operating systems and programming languages, not the latest hipster startup that nobody will remember n three years.  Better even, the screenshots were taken in 2002 and now, 13 years later, reiterated.

desktop_bwk_2015 Two things I found interesting here:

  1. Pretty much everyone calls their setup “boring”, yet it’s obviously slow functional that very little changes over time.
  2. Some of these screenshots feature setups so basic, that for those people who are not too familiar with the applications used, it would be difficult to choose which screenshot is from 2002 and which one is from 2015.

And while I’m nowhere near that level of developer, I still have to say that my desktop hasn’t changed much in the last 13 years either.  I am spending my days in the MATE Desktop Environment, which is a fork of Gnome to maintain the awesome Gnome 2 interface and not all that craziness of Gnome 3.  And like many other people featured here, I mostly use the browser and a gadzillion of terminal windows for my work.  I also have Vim keybindings burnt into my fingers, and I can’t imagine switching to something else ever.  Here’s how it looks today.

desktop

I’m sure there must be a screenshot of my desktop from back in the days somewhere on this blog, but I don’t think I’ll find it.