16 Linux Books and Videos for System Administrator

Having knowledge of Linux is essential for any system administration, middleware, web engineer job.

Linux is used almost everywhere in production or a non-production environment. There are thousands of article, book, video training to explore and learn but that would be time-consuming.

Instead, you can follow one or two related books or online training.

The following learning materials cover a large number of Linux Administration tasks from beginning to expert level. So pick the one suits you.

Source: 16 Linux Books and Videos for System Administrator

Linux Inside – A book-in-progress about the Linux kernel and its internals

Linux Inside” is a book-in-progress about the Linux kernel and its internals.  You can read it online or download as a PDF.  It’s also available in several languages.  Some of the things that you’ll find inside are:

  • The boot process
  • Initialization
  • Interrupts
  • System calls
  • Timers and time management
  • Synchronization primitives
  • Memory management
  • SMP
  • Data structures in the Linux kernel
  • … and more.

 

A Practical Guide to Linux Commands, Editors, and Shell Programming

I came across the second edition of the Prentice Hall’s “A Practical Guide to Linux Commands, Editors, and Shell Programming” by Mark G. Sobell (original link).  This is a rather lengthy book at just over 1,000 pages, covering everything from history of Linux and basic commands, all the way to bash, Perl, and sed, and how things work both on the inside and outside.

It’s probably not one of those books to read from cover to cover, but quite handy to keep as a reference and flip a few pages once in a while.

Bible Or Qur’an

Not being religious at all, I try to avoid the subject in this blog, but I think Bible Or Qur’an website deserves a mention. Mission statement from the front page:

The mission of BibleOrQuran is to educate people about the true nature and content of the Bible and Qur’an. False statements such as “81% of the Qur’an is about killing infidels!” and “The bible teaches only peace!” are commonly thrown around with little evidence to back them up. Despite their lack of credibility, however, they still continue to polarize and cause irrational hate and fear. We hope that by showing random Bible or Qur’an passages, we show how similar the two texts are and allay many of the fears of Islam and its teachings.

Basically, you get to see a short quote and then pick which of the two books it is from.  The website keeps the score, showing you how well you are doing on the guesswork.  In the meantime it drives the point of similarity in the depth and mood of both the Bible and the Qur’an.

Simple and effective, for those, of course, who can be convinced…

The Most Mentioned Books On StackOverflow

Slashdot links to “The Most Mentioned Books On StackOverflow“.

How we did it:

  • We got database dump of all user-contributed content on the Stack Exchange network (can be downloaded here)
  • Extracted questions and answers made on stackoverflow
  • Found all amazon.com links and counted it
  • Created tag-based search for your convenience
  • Brought it to you

I’ve previously linked to a similar selection of “Top 29 books on Amazon from Hacker News comments“.

Open Source Lawyer as a Career

OpenSource.com runs this article on “What to know before jumping into a career as an open source lawyer“.  Whether or not you are planning to take that path, the article has a few interesting links and quotes.

Recently, at work, we’ve been trying to get a hold of a lawyer with Open Source experience.  Just for the consultation or two.  I wasn’t very optimistic about it, as I had a feeling those are rare beasts.  My suspicion was confirmed to a degree.  But this article reaffirms it even further:

Only a few dozen new grads a year are hired to do anything even vaguely involving open source. Only a few dozen lawyers in the entire world dedicate more than a quarter of their time to open source. Only a lucky handful, like those at Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) and Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC), work primarily directly for communities and volunteer developers.

The article also links to a couple of books on the subject, which I’m pretty sure I’ll need to buy and read soon, unless we find somebody who is actually a lawyer and has done some work in Open Source space.

The first one is “The Tech Contracts Handbook: Cloud Computing Agreements, Software Licenses, and Other IT Contracts for Lawyers and Businesspeople“.

The Tech Contracts Handbook is a practical, user-friendly reference manual and training guide on cloud computing agreements, software licenses, and other IT contracts. It’s a clause-by-clause “how to” resource, covering the issues at stake and offering negotiation tips and sample contract language.

The Handbook is for both lawyers and businesspeople — including contract managers, procurement officers, in-house and outside counsel, salespeople, and anyone else responsible for getting IT deals done. Perhaps, most important, it uses clear, simple English, like a good contract.

Topics covered include:

  • Software-as-a-service (SaaS) subscriptions
  • Warranties and service level agreements (SLA’s)
  • Data security and privacy
  • Indemnities
  • Disaster recovery (DR)
  • Non-competes
  • Limitations of liability
  • Clickwraps
  • Open source software
  • Nondisclosure agreements (NDA’s) and confidentiality
  • Technology escrow
  • Copyright and other intellectual property (IP) licensing
  • Internet and e-commerce contracts
  • And much more …

The second one is “A Primer on Intellectual Property Licensing“.

A PRIMER ON INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LICENSING (Second Edition) is a compact, practical guide to one of the most dynamic and popular areas of legal practice today-intellectual property licensing. Developed by an attorney in private practice who specializes in Silicon Valley technology licensing, this guide presents the basic rules of law you need to know for a licensing practice, along with helpful examples of contractual language, practice tips, and insights on custom and practice in the industry. This textbook is appropriate for a law school or business school seminar, or for practicing attorneys who wish to expand their practice into this exciting field. Individual chapters from this text are also available for seminars and CLE presentations (in electronic format).

100 Favorite Programming, Computer and Science Books

Peteris Krumins, of the Browserling fame, has a series of blog posts on his top favorite programming, computer and science books.  It’s an excellent selection of titles, from which I’ve read only a fraction.  Good timing for the Christmas shopping too.  Here are the blog posts in the series so far (5 books per post):

Even with the 30 books mentioned so far, there are new things to read and learn.  I wonder how many of the notes to self I’ll have by the time the whole 100 are listed.