Connected, but wireless

Once again I have to thank my brother, who supplies me with hardware, fast and cheap.  This time he got me D-Link DWL-G520 wireless card (PCI).  I plugged it into my home server (appologies for a few short downtimes), downloaded and installed madwifi drivers from ATrpms, and go immediately connected with my notebook.  Everything works extremely well.

Now I have to think about securing the wireless network.  Previously, I was thinking to ignore the issue due to the lack of competent neighbors, but when I scanned looked around and found as many as 4 wireless networks within my reach, I reconsidered.

The question now is which option to choose?  WEP, WPA-PSK, VPN?  I don’t want to spend a lot of time on this, and I have somewhat contradicting requirements – I want to easily provide network connectivity to my guests, but I don’t want every passer-by to use my connection.  Hopefully, I’ll figure this all out before someone else will mess things up.  (Hint for bad guys: please, stay away for some time).

13 thoughts on “Connected, but wireless”


  1. For my home wifi network I use WPA2 Personal. I am also trying to do a VPN Server so that when I have to change things on the linux machine I’ll have to be in the network. But I can’t make it work. If I could I might change the WPA2 Personal to VPN Only.

    I hope I didn’t confuse you more…


  2. Grigory,

    WEP is considered as very vulnerable.

    And so I’ve heard. :)
    Still, better than nothing, and might be just enough for the home network.

    Yes, it is better to use any WPA.

    WPA is a pain to setup. Or at least it looks so from the first glance.

    Maybe I should just leave everything as it is. ;) Just a thought.


  3. It’s up to you. But keep in mind following

    WPA is considered to be more easy to configure then WPE. WPE rely on long hexadecimal string which needs to entered at each device. Some devices might support ASCII, but still not all. In WPA alphanumeric string is used. (May be you was confused with WPA Enterprise, which uses RADIUS server?)

    With WEP -- If somebody attacks your network he will probably succeed.

    But WEP is supported by all cards while WPA is not supported by old cards.

    Anyway check two thing:
    See if WEP is enabled, as manufacturers like to disable it.
    Change default passwords -- it is first what bad guys try.


  4. Thanks Grigory, I’ll check it out.

    By the way, something sounded confusing:

    WPE rely on long hexadecimal string

    vs.

    In WPA alphanumeric string is used.

    Aren’t hexadecimal strings a subset of alphanumeric ones? :)

    Regarding:

    May be you was confused with WPA Enterprise, which uses RADIUS server?

    The terminology is confusing indeed. I’ve read that WPA requires a radius server, while WPA-PSK operates on fixed keys.

  5. Aren’t hexadecimal strings a subset of alphanumeric ones?

    Yes, my fault. It’s better to say in this way – WEP implementation of each device relay on manufacturer chosen subset, like hexadecimal string. So, connecting devices from different manufacturers may be confusing. WAP does not have such problem as it rely on alphanumeric one.

    The terminology is confusing indeed. I’ve read that WPA requires a radius server, while WPA-PSK operates on fixed keys.

    There are two WPA: WPA personal (WP-PSK) with, yes, fixed keys and WPA enterprise with RADIUS server, certificates and like this stuff.
    Very easy to choose:)

Leave a Comment